School close

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
polos
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue 02 Dec, 2014 5:37 am

Re: School close

Post by polos »

Thank you everyone for your replys. I've drawn a blank the same as everyone else here although I have one suggestion although it's a very remote possibility.
There was a school at the bottom of Alfred Street just off boar lane.
This was the lancastrian school and the dated would match to be on early maps although its not exactly where depicted on the map.

iansmithofotley
Posts: 493
Joined: Fri 28 Dec, 2007 4:10 pm

Re: School close

Post by iansmithofotley »

Hi Leodian,

Just as a matter of interest, looking at the history of Leeds Grammar School, it looks as though it was originally located in Vicar Lane, before it moved to Hyde Park/Woodhouse Moor :

https://www.gsal.org.uk/about/history/

Ian

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Leodian
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Joined: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 8:03 am

Re: School close

Post by Leodian »

iansmithofotley wrote:
Sat 11 Jul, 2020 10:29 am
Hi Leodian,

Just as a matter of interest, looking at the history of Leeds Grammar School, it looks as though it was originally located in Vicar Lane, before it moved to Hyde Park/Woodhouse Moor :

https://www.gsal.org.uk/about/history/

Ian
Hi Ian :)

Thanks for the link to what has interesting history information about Leeds Grammar School. It certainly has moved locations over the years. That's a very impressive building in 'The Leeds Grammar School, Woodhouse Moor. Opened 1859' image. I wonder what happened to that building? With the current seemingly ever going on work on the Headrow/Vicar Lane area I wonder if any remains of the old school location have been found?
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

iansmithofotley
Posts: 493
Joined: Fri 28 Dec, 2007 4:10 pm

Re: School close

Post by iansmithofotley »

Hi Leodian,

Here is another interesting website about the Leeds Grammar School :

http://www.trevormidgley.com/LGSHistories/Kelsey.html

Ian

polos
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Joined: Tue 02 Dec, 2014 5:37 am

Re: School close

Post by polos »

In regards to the old school on vicar Lane I've spent hours and hours researching this. It was still standing in the 1900s.

I think it was built by John Harrison not far from his church and if I have my bearings correct the roadworks probably won't reveal anything because I think its underneath where the Sony centre is now.
Interesting subject almost definitely already covered on here.
http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?reso ... 09_8680361

polos
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Joined: Tue 02 Dec, 2014 5:37 am

Re: School close

Post by polos »

Also this same building is mentioned in Thoresbys ducatus

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blackprince
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Re: School close

Post by blackprince »

The aforementioned Civil, Ecclesiastical, Literary, Commercial, and Miscellaneous ..., Volume 2 by Edward Parsons dated (1834) also confirms that by that date School Close referred to a district

P140
"The whole district known under the general name of School Close was formerly a confused labyrinth of scattered buildings , through which numerous passengers proceeding to Holbeck from the western parts of the town, threaded their way to an inconvenient and sometimes dangerous ferry. A wide street however was opened from Mill Hill to the river , materially increasing the value of the property in the neighbourhood , while a footbridge over the river opened in 1829, formed the long wanted communication with the vast population on the southern side of the Aire."
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!

jma
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Joined: Fri 05 Aug, 2016 3:38 pm

Re: School close

Post by jma »

I think it's worth noting that various common modern street names had different and specific meanings in the past. As urban areas have grown and the naming of streets has been formalised needing more names, so usage has changed. There are some obviously absurd ones like "crescent" being used for a straight street, and "chase" is another. Nowadays, "close" generally means a cul-de-sac on an estate. A cathedral close is the property around a cathedral. I could imagine that at some point the same thinking might be applied to the area around a school, including any houses for staff in the days when most people lived close to their place of work by necessity.
===================================================

PS Here's a poem about a school close
There's a breathless hush in the Close to-night—
Ten to make and the match to win—
A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
An hour to play and the last man in.
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
Or the selfish hope of a season's fame,
But his captain's hand on his shoulder smote
'Play up! play up! and play the game! '

The sand of the desert is sodden red,—
Red with the wreck of a square that broke; —
The Gatling's jammed and the Colonel dead,
And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
The river of death has brimmed his banks,
And England's far, and Honour a name,
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks:
'Play up! play up! and play the game! '

This is the word that year by year,
While in her place the school is set,
Every one of her sons must hear,
And none that hears it dare forget.
This they all with a joyful mind
Bear through life like a torch in flame,
And falling fling to the host behind—
'Play up! play up! and play the game!
Sir Henry Newbolt

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Leodian
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Joined: Thu 10 Jun, 2010 8:03 am

Re: School close

Post by Leodian »

blackprince wrote:
Sat 11 Jul, 2020 4:23 pm
The aforementioned Civil, Ecclesiastical, Literary, Commercial, and Miscellaneous ..., Volume 2 by Edward Parsons dated (1834) also confirms that by that date School Close referred to a district

P140
"The whole district known under the general name of School Close was formerly a confused labyrinth of scattered buildings , through which numerous passengers proceeding to Holbeck from the western parts of the town, threaded their way to an inconvenient and sometimes dangerous ferry. A wide street however was opened from Mill Hill to the river , materially increasing the value of the property in the neighbourhood , while a footbridge over the river opened in 1829, formed the long wanted communication with the vast population on the southern side of the Aire."
Thanks blackprince for that interesting information. I clearly did not look far enough in the book!

PS. With the one-way systems and all the road works currently going on I often find the centre of Leeds to be "a confused labyrinth"!
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

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blackprince
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Re: School close

Post by blackprince »

Hi Leodian,
Google works in mysterious ways. Searching for "school close Leeds" I had to sift through dozens of irrelevant hits about school closures before finding the same e-book as yourself. Funnily it took me straight to the paragraph I quoted and missed the one you found. The e-book I found was stored in the University of Milwaukee library, which I find amazing. Just imagining a whole department of scholars devoted to "ancient Leeds studies" in the mid-west :).
I certainly found the road system labyrinthine on my last visit to Leeds, which annoyed me no end because I used to know it like the back of my hand.
Maybe the Leeds tourist board should promote the labyrinth as an attraction ( Knossos in Crete comes to mind)
John aka BP
It used to be said that the statue of the Black Prince had been placed in City Square , near the station, pointing South to tell all the southerners who've just got off the train to b****r off back down south!

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