Street names

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
TomD
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue 27 Mar, 2007 1:40 pm

Postby TomD » Fri 25 May, 2007 2:05 pm

thanks for that chameleon...bloody hell i know who lives at bay horse farm very well!!!
sarah_orange
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu 10 May, 2007 7:24 am

Postby sarah_orange » Fri 25 May, 2007 4:57 pm

I just realised this should probably be moved to the 'names' section which for some reason I didn't notice when I started it.was just pootling around on leodis, as you do, and I came across this, which you all probably know but I didn't:"The section of the Headrow, off camera left* was formerly known as Guildford Street and the section in front of Lewis's, right, was known as Upperhead Row. A competition was held by the Yorkshire Evening Post to rename the street in 1929. The name chosen for the considerably widened road was 'The Headrows'. By the time Lewis's opened the 'S' had been dropped and this main thoroughfare, running from the Town Hall at the west end to Mabgate Circus at the east end, became known simply as the Headrow."*the picture is of the lewis' building during construction so off camera left would be the section from dortmund square to albion street I assume (poss a bit further to the guildford pub now I think of it)I'd just assumed that the headrow was an old name like eastgate and briggate.
sarah_orange
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu 10 May, 2007 7:24 am

Postby sarah_orange » Fri 25 May, 2007 5:05 pm

yay! ta for moving it!
sarah_orange
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu 10 May, 2007 7:24 am

Postby sarah_orange » Fri 25 May, 2007 5:06 pm

erm but shouldn't it be in 'names'?

Martyn
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri 23 Feb, 2007 8:56 am

Postby Martyn » Fri 25 May, 2007 7:17 pm

I've heard a couple of explanations of the name Upperhead row. There was also a Lowerhead row. The more mundane is that they were originally part of a medieval footpath that ran across the head of the fields to the north of Briggate. Therefore 'Head' row.More excitingly, the other explanation is that the heads of executed criminals were displayed on spikes along this road as a deterrant to would-be miscreants. Now that's what I call an ASBO.I think reason one is the most likely but would prefer to believe the second.
http://www.siddles.me.ukYou can take a horse to water but a pencil must be lead.Stan Laurel.
fluffysheep
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed 16 May, 2007 1:04 pm

Postby fluffysheep » Mon 25 Jun, 2007 2:19 pm

Saw this on the tourist/historical information board outside the Parish Church/The Palace, a suggestion for where the name "The Calls" comes from."The area behind the Parish Church extending along the riverside to Leeds Bridge has for centuries been known as The Calls. It's name probably derives from the Latin 'callis' - a narrow track or from the wooden piles or 'calls' driven into the river bank to prevent it being washed away"
LS1
Posts: 2170
Joined: Mon 23 Jul, 2007 8:30 am

Postby LS1 » Mon 24 Sep, 2007 9:24 am

Pitfall Street was so called becuse of the mills that stood there once, Pitfall Mill I think it was called strangely enough, and from what I can deduce I think it was a flour or corn mill.
LS1
Posts: 2170
Joined: Mon 23 Jul, 2007 8:30 am

Postby LS1 » Mon 24 Sep, 2007 9:30 am

I was thinkabout this thge other day in regard to all street names in Leeds. You have various different names obviously but why? Near Chapel Allerton there is the "Canadian Estate" with Dominion Avenue, Montreal Place etc, and then the Chelwoods off Street Lane, Ayresome Avenue near there. Why were these streets so called?Is it becuase the bulders of the houses just chose random names or is there something mroe specific about it all. I can understand some of them like Cowper Street, Leopole Street, Louis Street and Francis Street being named after Earl Cowper whos land they were built on, and Cardigan Road etc for the Earl of Cardigan (charge of the light brigade fame!) and Kimberley, Kitchener up at the top of Harehills Lane probably from the Boer War era. But why are newer streets given the names they are? I could go on but lets see if someone has any answers!

LS1
Posts: 2170
Joined: Mon 23 Jul, 2007 8:30 am

Postby LS1 » Mon 24 Sep, 2007 9:33 am

sarah_orange wrote: I just realised this should probably be moved to the 'names' section which for some reason I didn't notice when I started it.was just pootling around on leodis, as you do, and I came across this, which you all probably know but I didn't:"The section of the Headrow, off camera left* was formerly known as Guildford Street and the section in front of Lewis's, right, was known as Upperhead Row. A competition was held by the Yorkshire Evening Post to rename the street in 1929. The name chosen for the considerably widened road was 'The Headrows'. By the time Lewis's opened the 'S' had been dropped and this main thoroughfare, running from the Town Hall at the west end to Mabgate Circus at the east end, became known simply as the Headrow."*the picture is of the lewis' building during construction so off camera left would be the section from dortmund square to albion street I assume (poss a bit further to the guildford pub now I think of it)I'd just assumed that the headrow was an old name like eastgate and briggate. The other end was Park Lane still at one time, just outside the library area. In fact if you go down the Headrow towards Westgate on the left hand side of the road, one of the alleyways there says something like "147 Headrow, formerley 37 Park lane" - dead giveaway! At this point also Albion Street didnt run this far up, and Woodhouse Lane in fact came right down to what is the Headow.
farbank
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon 25 Jun, 2007 12:37 pm

Postby farbank » Mon 24 Sep, 2007 11:32 am

The areas of East/South Parades, were constructed originally as highly desirable residential properties. Similar to those in Park Sq. This area remember was on the very edge of the 'smelly' quarter. And mostly surrounded by open fields, river views etc.East Parade 'faced' east. South Parade south.Chameleon was spot on about Coal Rd. But the guided tour of Temple Newsam cellars, informed us that the coal transported to Harewood, actually came from there. Though the Irwin family did own the mines. However , I was told that of numerous 'bell-pits' in the area, Shadwell had its very own. And this could be reflected in the Colliers Lane name.And wasn't the Raynvilles named after some feudal lord that originally owned the estates land. From the 13/14th.C.?





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