Killingbeck name.

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Leodian
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Killingbeck name.

Post by Leodian »

Wykebeck area is presumably named from the Wyke/Wike Beck, Holbeck from the Hol Beck, Stainbeck from the Stain Beck. I have looked at old maps in the National Library of Scotland and the Old Maps UK websites but I have not spotted any water channel labelled Killing Beck (if it is labelled I must have missed it). I wonder therefore how Killingbeck came to be so named? I suspect there must have been (or still is but hidden) a Killing Beck. I've tried a Google search but without ploughing through hundreds of results I've not readily found an answer. Any help will be appreciated.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

j.c.d.
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by j.c.d. »

As my family moved from the Bank, Richmond Hill onto the brand new Gipton Estate 1935 , that area which is now A.S.D.A. etc was all open fields apart from a Infectious Hospital and the story was there had been a big battle in that area and the beck ? ran with blood.
Mind you we believed all sorts in those days as the world was a lot smaller.

Bruno
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by Bruno »

I believe it was the Cock Beck which was turned red with blood from the dead of the Battle of Towton in the Wars of the Roses 1461?
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hyperioncantlogin
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by hyperioncantlogin »


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Leodian
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by Leodian »

hyperioncantlogin wrote:How about this.http://killingbeck14.blogspot.co.uk/
Thanks all for your inputs. The information brought up through the link you provided hyperioncantlogin is most interesting. In it I particularly note the "The Yorkshire Place Names Society has ‘Killingbeck’ from ‘Cille’ a person’s name, ‘Inga’ a group of people or followers, and ‘beck’ a later addition for the Wykebeck which runs along the foot of the hill. (The Place Names of the West Riding of Yorkshire, Part 4, AH Smith, page 121).". It seems therefore that there might never have been a Killing Beck stream.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

j.c.d.
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by j.c.d. »

When I was a lad the area from York Road ( Echo bridge ) along Wykebeck Valley Road to what is now St. NIcholas Church was known locally as "Monkey bridge" ?? at that time that area were just piles of earth which presumably had been dumped there from building work. then the Council flattened it and we used to play football on there In later year the two blocks of high rise flats were built on that land. There was a white wooden bridge that crossed the Beck but I really think this name was given to the whole area. Any explanation etc. appreciated.

warringtonrhino
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by warringtonrhino »

Killingbeck is not mentioned in the Domesday survey, but the surrounding settlements of Halton, Seacroft, and Coldcotes are. A local name for Killingbeck is ‘Monkeybridge’ and the West Yorkshire Archaeological Survey to AD 1500 (vol 2, page 495) undertaken in the 1980’s describes a lost place called ‘Monechay’ which is possibly at Bramham, but could be Killingbeck? A court roll of the sixteenth century records the name within the Scholes, Roundhay and Barwick area –
‘…no foreigner shall surcharge the commons viz Secroft, Austrope, Killingbeck and Munkey.’
(History of Barwick in Elmet, Thoresby Society)

IanLeeds1
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by IanLeeds1 »

I've lived around this area all my life, before the Asda was built there was a beck that ran from near the road to Killingbeck Hospital down across the fields (Asda Carpark now), it runs under Killingbeck Drive and into the small pond then eventually into Wykebeck.

Lookatleeds
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Re: Killingbeck name.

Post by Lookatleeds »

I read somewhere that in the 13th century this area was gifted to the Knights Templar of Newsam by a fella called Walter De Kilingbec. And wasn't there a mayor or Vicar of Leeds with the name Killingbeck in the 1600s?
Possibly a connection there.

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