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Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 12:16 am
by book
Phallica2000 wrote: Somebody might have already said this one and it's quite specific to Armley but calling half a house brick a 'Half-Charlie'.Strangely a few people I know that grew up in Armley haven't heard of it but a few have. How about you guys? Heard it called a half knacker

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 9:25 am
by somme1916
Johnny39 wrote: Phallica2000 wrote: drapesy wrote: Has anyone mentioned 'spice' for 'sweets' - or 'spanish' for 'licqourice'?? I always knew liquorice as 'Spanish', wonder where that came from? I think the reason it is called "Spanish" is because the liquorice plant originated in Spain. There has been a programme on BBC recently where Michael Portillo does a rail journey and he landed in Pontefract. He was in company with a local worthy who had been in the confectionary trade and I'm pretty sure this was his explanation for the "Spanish" name. I hope this helps. Was always "spanish" when I was nobbut a lad !Also,Have you got any spogs ?Have you got any spice ?Both the above meaning sweets......How about "Wah na a man med o'band ?very common 60'70's around tingley/morley....Yes,and "stop laikin abaht"....and the first "naughty" word we commonly used was "chuffin"...pretty tame stuff nar but wan't then !I used to love...."He were necking wi 'er,dirty get"And plenty much more..............

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 10:26 am
by Si
Johnny39 wrote: Phallica2000 wrote: drapesy wrote: Has anyone mentioned 'spice' for 'sweets' - or 'spanish' for 'licqourice'?? I always knew liquorice as 'Spanish', wonder where that came from? I think the reason it is called "Spanish" is because the liquorice plant originated in Spain. There has been a programme on BBC recently where Michael Portillo does a rail journey and he landed in Pontefract. He was in company with a local worthy who had been in the confectionary trade and I'm pretty sure this was his explanation for the "Spanish" name. I hope this helps. I remember being told many years ago, that as well as Pomfret, or Pontefract Cakes, these liquorice sweets were sometimes known as "Spanish Thumpers." Anyone else heard them called this?     

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 11:56 am
by Jogon
I allus thought 'Spanish' was a stronger version of liquorice. Grandpa was a user, and had a penknife for cutting the stuff.

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 1:43 pm
by somme1916
Jogon wrote: I allus thought 'Spanish' was a stronger version of liquorice. Grandpa was a user, and had a penknife for cutting the stuff. Aye,the root or stick was fearsome stuff and usually turned your teeth dark green if you chomped on it too long,trying to suck all the juice out....eventually,this looked more like black ! Just like chewing a small tree branch.    

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 1:50 pm
by Caron
Jogon wrote: I allus thought 'Spanish' was a stronger version of liquorice. Grandpa was a user, and had a penknife for cutting the stuff. Hi Jogon. Like you, I thought Spanish was more the woody stuff and Liquorice was the softer black/brown stuff.My boyfriend often bought me a length of liquorice in the 60's, (they'd have a fancy finger ring knotted at the bottom), we got engaged every week....ahh, happy days!        

Posted: Mon 10 Sep, 2012 1:56 pm
by Mork of Ork
Caron wrote: Jogon wrote: I allus thought 'Spanish' was a stronger version of liquorice. Grandpa was a user, and had a penknife for cutting the stuff. Hi Jogon. Like you, I thought Spanish was more the woody stuff and Liquorice was the softer black/brown stuff.My boyfriend often bought me a length of liquorice in the 60's, (they'd have a fancy finger ring knotted at the bottom), we got engaged every week....ahh, happy days!         My granddad used to always call the red liquorice 'spanish' and he used to call sweets 'spice'.He was very Yorkshire though, he was all 'oss, coit, booits etc.

Posted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 3:39 pm
by majorhoundii
jdbythesea wrote: Phallica2000 wrote: stevief wrote: I think the expression 'to laik'is more predominant in Bradford than Leeds.I've worked with blokes from all over Yorkshire and dialects can vary from one town to the next.The first time I came across 'laik'was visiting an old mate who'd married a Bradford lass.When I called(not ca'l'ed)his wife told me he'd gone to watch city laik and I thought it was a place! I've never heard of this one before, is it in any specific areas of Leeds, do you know? I too often use laik to mean play. Back in the 70s (3 day week era) many Leeds factories - especially those in the tailoring and textile industries - were put on short time working or "laid off". Often you'd hear someone asking "are you working or laiking this week ?". It was used a lot in the Guiseley and Yeadon areas.JD Laik, like many other Yorkshire dialect words (barn for child say) is based on Norse. The Danish word for game/play is "leg" and Leggo is from the same root. http://www.viking.no/e/england/e-yorkshire_norse.htm

Posted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 5:08 pm
by stutterdog
majorhoundii wrote: jdbythesea wrote: Phallica2000 wrote: stevief wrote: I think the expression 'to laik'is more predominant in Bradford than Leeds.I've worked with blokes from all over Yorkshire and dialects can vary from one town to the next.The first time I came across 'laik'was visiting an old mate who'd married a Bradford lass.When I called(not ca'l'ed)his wife told me he'd gone to watch city laik and I thought it was a place! I've never heard of this one before, is it in any specific areas of Leeds, do you know? I too often use laik to mean play. Back in the 70s (3 day week era) many Leeds factories - especially those in the tailoring and textile industries - were put on short time working or "laid off". Often you'd hear someone asking "are you working or laiking this week ?". It was used a lot in the Guiseley and Yeadon areas.JD Laik, like many other Yorkshire dialect words (barn for child say) is based on Norse. The Danish word for game/play is "leg" and Leggo is from the same root. http://www.viking.no/e/england/e-yorkshire_norse.htm My Dad worked down the pit at Shawcross and if he didn't go in on Mon.he would say he was laiking=playing!

Posted: Sun 23 Sep, 2012 8:55 pm
by Loiner in Cyprus
stutterdog wrote: majorhoundii wrote: jdbythesea wrote: Phallica2000 wrote: stevief wrote: I think the expression 'to laik'is more predominant in Bradford than Leeds.I've worked with blokes from all over Yorkshire and dialects can vary from one town to the next.The first time I came across 'laik'was visiting an old mate who'd married a Bradford lass.When I called(not ca'l'ed)his wife told me he'd gone to watch city laik and I thought it was a place! I've never heard of this one before, is it in any specific areas of Leeds, do you know? I too often use laik to mean play. Back in the 70s (3 day week era) many Leeds factories - especially those in the tailoring and textile industries - were put on short time working or "laid off". Often you'd hear someone asking "are you working or laiking this week ?". It was used a lot in the Guiseley and Yeadon areas.JD Laik, like many other Yorkshire dialect words (barn for child say) is based on Norse. The Danish word for game/play is "leg" and Leggo is from the same root. http://www.viking.no/e/england/e-yorkshire_norse.htm My Dad worked down the pit at Shawcross and if he didn't go in on Mon.he would say he was laiking=playing! In the 60s I worked at Miggy pit and there you would also say you were laiking if you took a day off.