Leodis/Loidis

The origins and history of placenames, nicknames, local slang, etc.
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Briggy
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Post by Briggy »

Not sure if this adds to our info, or makes it more complicated, but this is the writing of an historian called Edmund Bogg, some time last century (or the one before!)"In the midst of the large forest, which, in Celto-Roman times, shadowed the kingdom of Elmet, the land of the Leogrys, Leoidi, Ludees, Ledes (the original Celtic people), was a clearing of timber on and around the brow of a small eminence near the river, and within this clearing stood a little settlement; or, as one old British writers with vivid imagination describes it: “The Caer Loid Coit,” which means, “The stronghold of the Leoidi, in the wood of Elmet.” This situation was naturally strong; besides other advantages, it was well watered by river and stream, being in the angle of land between and contiguous to both."Although Leeds is referred to by no fewer than three historians, who wrote in the early Saxon period, very little which can be relied on as authentic is known about the place previous to the Norman era. Bede mentions it as “In regione quae vocatur Loidis;” Nennius as the “Caer Loid Coit;” again, Mailoc or Madoc, brother to St. Gildas, is said “to have journeyed to Luihes, in the district of Elmail” (doubtless the reading should he Luides and Elmet) “

sundowner
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Post by sundowner »

Briggy wrote: Not sure if this adds to our info, or makes it more complicated, but this is the writing of an historian called Edmund Bogg, some time last century (or the one before!)"In the midst of the large forest, which, in Celto-Roman times, shadowed the kingdom of Elmet, the land of the Leogrys, Leoidi, Ludees, Ledes (the original Celtic people), was a clearing of timber on and around the brow of a small eminence near the river, and within this clearing stood a little settlement; or, as one old British writers with vivid imagination describes it: “The Caer Loid Coit,” which means, “The stronghold of the Leoidi, in the wood of Elmet.” This situation was naturally strong; besides other advantages, it was well watered by river and stream, being in the angle of land between and contiguous to both."Although Leeds is referred to by no fewer than three historians, who wrote in the early Saxon period, very little which can be relied on as authentic is known about the place previous to the Norman era. Bede mentions it as “In regione quae vocatur Loidis;” Nennius as the “Caer Loid Coit;” again, Mailoc or Madoc, brother to St. Gildas, is said “to have journeyed to Luihes, in the district of Elmail” (doubtless the reading should he Luides and Elmet) “ Hi Briggy Quarry Hill would fit that spot earth works are supposed to have been found there in the past. And of course settlement would have been on the high ground with the river and stream close by.

Cardiarms
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Post by Cardiarms »

I thought the old 'castle' was in the mill hill area?

LS1
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Post by LS1 »

Cardiarms wrote: I thought the old 'castle' was in the mill hill area? It was wasn't it? On where the Scabby Taps is?

Trojan
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Post by Trojan »

"caer" is Welsh for city, with a capital it's Welsh for Chester.Chester, cester (Leic.. and Worc...) and caster are Angliscised versions of the Latin for camp. When the Romans left Britain it was a Romanised Celtic country - before the Angles Saxons and Jutes invaded.    
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wiggy
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Post by wiggy »

simon2710 wrote: For those who don't already know Leodis/Loidis was the victorian name for Leeds before it changed. It comes from the meaning Loiner or citizen of Leeds.Heres how the name has changed over the years......(Not in order)Loidis -> Leodis -> Ledes -> Leedes -> (currently) Leeds leeds was already called leeds during the time of lelland..(medieval times).
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drapesy
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Post by drapesy »

Si wrote: drapesy wrote: Briggy wrote: Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derivedfrom the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bedefrom the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others supposei t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is atown called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so calledfrom leading to a beck or stream where those animals werewashed."'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate' Hi Drapesy. Been on holiday?If "gate" means "street" in olden times, what does "street" mean? (As in Watling Street, etc?) No I've just been really busy!
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cnosni
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Post by cnosni »

Briggy wrote: Not sure if this adds to our info, or makes it more complicated, but this is the writing of an historian called Edmund Bogg, some time last century (or the one before!)"In the midst of the large forest, which, in Celto-Roman times, shadowed the kingdom of Elmet, the land of the Leogrys, Leoidi, Ludees, Ledes (the original Celtic people), was a clearing of timber on and around the brow of a small eminence near the river, and within this clearing stood a little settlement; or, as one old British writers with vivid imagination describes it: “The Caer Loid Coit,” which means, “The stronghold of the Leoidi, in the wood of Elmet.” This situation was naturally strong; besides other advantages, it was well watered by river and stream, being in the angle of land between and contiguous to both."Although Leeds is referred to by no fewer than three historians, who wrote in the early Saxon period, very little which can be relied on as authentic is known about the place previous to the Norman era. Bede mentions it as “In regione quae vocatur Loidis;” Nennius as the “Caer Loid Coit;” again, Mailoc or Madoc, brother to St. Gildas, is said “to have journeyed to Luihes, in the district of Elmail” (doubtless the reading should he Luides and Elmet) “ Well thats fine for Mr Bogg,but what is his source,especially for the bit that im interested in is"or, as one old British writers with vivid imagination describes it: “The Caer Loid Coit,"Therein lies the problem,old British writers with a VIVID IMAGINATION.In other words there is some "making up" going on,not factual research.As for Mailoc/Madoc being the brother to St Gildas then heres a link to a bit about St Gildashttp://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/1150-Cara ... htmlBugger me,its taken this long for King Arthur to come into it.Geoffrey of Monmouth has been shown to be the least trustworthy of historians,and once again we have someone who has a veted interest in promoting Celtic/Welsh heritage at a time of of subjegation by Norman kings of England.    
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cnosni
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Post by cnosni »

drapesy wrote: Si wrote: drapesy wrote: Briggy wrote: Just to throw another couple of theories into the pot, this is what the goold old Annals of Leeds, published in 1860, makes of the origin of the city name:"Leeds is supposed by Thoresby to be derivedfrom the British "cair hid colt", a town in the wood; by Bedefrom the first Saxon possessor named Loidi, others supposei t to be derived from our German ancestors, as there is atown called Leeds, on the river Dender in Austria Flanders,near which is the village of Holbeck. Briggate, the Bridgegate,—Kirkgate, the Church-gate,—Swinegate, so calledfrom leading to a beck or stream where those animals werewashed."'Gate' means street or lane - so Briggate means Bridge Street and Kirkgate means Church Street - not "the Bridgegate' or 'the Churchgate' Hi Drapesy. Been on holiday?If "gate" means "street" in olden times, what does "street" mean? (As in Watling Street, etc?) No I've just been really busy! well speak up man!!
Don't get me started!!My Flickr photos-http://www.flickr.com/photos/cnosni/Secret Leeds [email protected]

Trojan
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Post by Trojan »

wiggy wrote: simon2710 wrote: For those who don't already know Leodis/Loidis was the victorian name for Leeds before it changed. It comes from the meaning Loiner or citizen of Leeds.Heres how the name has changed over the years......(Not in order)Loidis -> Leodis -> Ledes -> Leedes -> (currently) Leeds leeds was already called leeds during the time of lelland..(medieval times). Leeds Grammar School Old Boys Rugby team used to be called "Old Leodensians" "Old Leos" for short.
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