Asket Hall

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
wiggy
Posts: 1088
Joined: Tue 26 Jun, 2007 9:39 am

Postby wiggy » Sat 12 Jan, 2008 9:03 am

glad you liked it anyway parksider,'tis a fine building,proving gipton was once a more 'genteel' place to live.
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy?
moose1978
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat 12 Jan, 2008 3:40 pm

Postby moose1978 » Sat 12 Jan, 2008 9:22 pm

wiggy wrote: The Parksider wrote: wiggy wrote: i have found the grange,it's between fearnville close and fearnville drive,surrounded by trees,can anyone give an insight as to who owned it ...etc..     I thought the Grange was pulled down and on the site Tetley's built a pug which they called the Grange. Then it shut.Exactly what does the building you saw look like - is it set off Dib Lane about 20 yards back??? its not been knocked down mate,it is still there,a picture of it was on yhe grange pub sign...but the building is still there.its further up dib lane and as the other chap says...so are the gate posts,on the right as you come down dib lane from oakwood lane. Hi all,I've just found this forum through Google after trying to find more info about this big boarded up house that is 100 yards from my front doorstep! I only saw it the other day when the New Year Resolution kicked in and I started my running, but could not believe I had never seen it before! (I've only lived here 6 months!!!) Well, thanks to your info above I know it is called the Grange and have seen the gateposts that people have mentioned as well. Does anyone have any more info about it's history and who owns it now. It is completely boarded up but it really does look like everything was just built round it.Cheers in advance!Mark
Attachments
__TFMF_2ga4wg455pmfrf45shvy2j55_ccd6b42a-091c-4389-a89a-b36f398714c7_0_main.jpg
__TFMF_2ga4wg455pmfrf45shvy2j55_ccd6b42a-091c-4389-a89a-b36f398714c7_0_main.jpg (154.96 KiB) Viewed 1710 times
The Parksider
Posts: 1561
Joined: Sat 10 Nov, 2007 3:55 am

Postby The Parksider » Sat 12 Jan, 2008 11:11 pm

moose1978 wrote: wiggy wrote: The Parksider wrote: wiggy wrote: i have found the grange,it's between fearnville close and fearnville drive,surrounded by trees,can anyone give an insight as to who owned it ...etc..     I thought the Grange was pulled down and on the site Tetley's built a pug which they called the Grange. Then it shut.Exactly what does the building you saw look like - is it set off Dib Lane about 20 yards back??? its not been knocked down mate,it is still there,a picture of it was on yhe grange pub sign...but the building is still there.its further up dib lane and as the other chap says...so are the gate posts,on the right as you come down dib lane from oakwood lane. Hi all,I've just found this forum through Google after trying to find more info about this big boarded up house that is 100 yards from my front doorstep! I only saw it the other day when the New Year Resolution kicked in and I started my running, but could not believe I had never seen it before! (I've only lived here 6 months!!!) Well, thanks to your info above I know it is called the Grange and have seen the gateposts that people have mentioned as well. Does anyone have any more info about it's history and who owns it now. It is completely boarded up but it really does look like everything was just built round it.Cheers in advance!Mark mark - those gateposts on Dib Lane are not The Grange's - they belong to "Fearnville" an old house that was pulled down years ago.These houses look as though lords and ladies should have lived in them. They are however ten a penny and were owned by people who simply had a lot of money probably from owning industrial companies during the industrial revolution and the days of the Empire. The equivalent houses are today out at Linton.If you want one of the old ones you can have The Grange as it's available!!!!!!.
electricaldave
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu 29 Nov, 2007 2:29 pm

Postby electricaldave » Sat 12 Jan, 2008 11:21 pm

In answer to WoodsiderWhen you start looking at Leeds history, you'll find that just over 100 years ago on Quarry Hill there were located some of the worst slums in the whole of Leeds, and this was a scene repeated all over the country.You can find evidence of how poor wages were when you discover that during the 1930's Leeds rent strike, the new council estates were largely inhabited by tradespersons, and they were complaining that while they could hardly afford their rents, people from the slums being rehoused and were even poorer were getting to live alongside them rent free.In other words, the workers, even skilled ones, were barely making ends meet, even just before WW2.During the late 1950's and early 1960's there were huge clearances of slums, but alongside this there were also widespread demolition of very large houses, mansions and the like.You can see how these two types of clearances coincided with the growth of Union power, and their sponsorship of the Labour party. My view is that the growth of organisation among workers was instrumental in improving conditions for them, yes you can mention other reasons, but without pressure from workers themselves I seriously doubt we would have come this far.Although there was a growth of the middle classes which had a moral view of human decency, you can see a redistribution of wealth, where workers were able to demand and get better standards of living.A pretty good demonstration of this is just to look at how council houses are designed - go to estates such as Rookwood which was one of the earlier council estates, or perhaps to Hawksworth, and you notice that the rooms are small, you could not get much furniture into them, but people didnt have much back then, quite a bit of that furniture was actually built in. Over the years the number of occupants of these houses has fallen, from around 6 to 8 to perhaps 3 or 4.Those houses when they were built were a huge improvement over the slums.Look at later council houses, such as those built on North Parkway and things are differant, far fewer built in fitments, much more space.Nowadays I doubt that if a council were to build more houses, they would build them so small for 6-8 occupants, they would not be seen as acceptable.We are so much better off, but only in the last 50 or so years, well within living memory, its been the norm for the last couple of thousand years that ordinary people in Britain had very poor incomes and living standards.The large Victorian former industrial buildings that we see, and try to preserve, such as Manningham Mill, or Hunslet Mill should be seen as monuments to the working classes - and by monuments I mean that in the old meaning of the word - as memorials and gravestones.Poverty for the working classes has historically been normal, and in some parts of the world it still is, we are lucky as its really only the last three or four generations that have had freedom from hunger and cold.As recently as the early 1960's we were sending children born out of wedlock to Australia, seized from their unfortunate mothers, and the roots of the childrens home on Street Lane are closely associated with the workhouse.

electricaldave
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu 29 Nov, 2007 2:29 pm

Postby electricaldave » Sat 12 Jan, 2008 11:22 pm

Oh poo!That message was directed at Parksider
moose1978
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat 12 Jan, 2008 3:40 pm

Postby moose1978 » Sun 13 Jan, 2008 9:19 am

electricaldave wrote: In answer to WoodsiderWhen you start looking at Leeds history, you'll find that just over 100 years ago on Quarry Hill there were located some of the worst slums in the whole of Leeds, and this was a scene repeated all over the country.You can find evidence of how poor wages were when you discover that during the 1930's Leeds rent strike, the new council estates were largely inhabited by tradespersons, and they were complaining that while they could hardly afford their rents, people from the slums being rehoused and were even poorer were getting to live alongside them rent free.In other words, the workers, even skilled ones, were barely making ends meet, even just before WW2.During the late 1950's and early 1960's there were huge clearances of slums, but alongside this there were also widespread demolition of very large houses, mansions and the like.You can see how these two types of clearances coincided with the growth of Union power, and their sponsorship of the Labour party. My view is that the growth of organisation among workers was instrumental in improving conditions for them, yes you can mention other reasons, but without pressure from workers themselves I seriously doubt we would have come this far.Although there was a growth of the middle classes which had a moral view of human decency, you can see a redistribution of wealth, where workers were able to demand and get better standards of living.A pretty good demonstration of this is just to look at how council houses are designed - go to estates such as Rookwood which was one of the earlier council estates, or perhaps to Hawksworth, and you notice that the rooms are small, you could not get much furniture into them, but people didnt have much back then, quite a bit of that furniture was actually built in. Over the years the number of occupants of these houses has fallen, from around 6 to 8 to perhaps 3 or 4.Those houses when they were built were a huge improvement over the slums.Look at later council houses, such as those built on North Parkway and things are differant, far fewer built in fitments, much more space.Nowadays I doubt that if a council were to build more houses, they would build them so small for 6-8 occupants, they would not be seen as acceptable.We are so much better off, but only in the last 50 or so years, well within living memory, its been the norm for the last couple of thousand years that ordinary people in Britain had very poor incomes and living standards.The large Victorian former industrial buildings that we see, and try to preserve, such as Manningham Mill, or Hunslet Mill should be seen as monuments to the working classes - and by monuments I mean that in the old meaning of the word - as memorials and gravestones.Poverty for the working classes has historically been normal, and in some parts of the world it still is, we are lucky as its really only the last three or four generations that have had freedom from hunger and cold.As recently as the early 1960's we were sending children born out of wedlock to Australia, seized from their unfortunate mothers, and the roots of the childrens home on Street Lane are closely associated with the workhouse. It's available - great!! Can anyone point me in the right direction to get more info.Thanks in advance
The Parksider
Posts: 1561
Joined: Sat 10 Nov, 2007 3:55 am

Postby The Parksider » Sun 13 Jan, 2008 3:00 pm

electricaldave wrote: In answer to WoodsiderWhen you start looking at Leeds history, you'll find that just over 100 years ago on Quarry Hill there were located some of the worst slums in the whole of Leeds, and this was a scene repeated all over the country.You can find evidence of how poor wages were when you discover that during the 1930's Leeds rent strike, the new council estates were largely inhabited by tradespersons, and they were complaining that while they could hardly afford their rents, people from the slums being rehoused and were even poorer were getting to live alongside them rent free.In other words, the workers, even skilled ones, were barely making ends meet, even just before WW2.During the late 1950's and early 1960's there were huge clearances of slums, but alongside this there were also widespread demolition of very large houses, mansions and the like.You can see how these two types of clearances coincided with the growth of Union power, and their sponsorship of the Labour party. My view is that the growth of organisation among workers was instrumental in improving conditions for them, yes you can mention other reasons, but without pressure from workers themselves I seriously doubt we would have come this far.Although there was a growth of the middle classes which had a moral view of human decency, you can see a redistribution of wealth, where workers were able to demand and get better standards of living.A pretty good demonstration of this is just to look at how council houses are designed - go to estates such as Rookwood which was one of the earlier council estates, or perhaps to Hawksworth, and you notice that the rooms are small, you could not get much furniture into them, but people didnt have much back then, quite a bit of that furniture was actually built in. Over the years the number of occupants of these houses has fallen, from around 6 to 8 to perhaps 3 or 4.Those houses when they were built were a huge improvement over the slums.Look at later council houses, such as those built on North Parkway and things are differant, far fewer built in fitments, much more space.Nowadays I doubt that if a council were to build more houses, they would build them so small for 6-8 occupants, they would not be seen as acceptable.We are so much better off, but only in the last 50 or so years, well within living memory, its been the norm for the last couple of thousand years that ordinary people in Britain had very poor incomes and living standards.The large Victorian former industrial buildings that we see, and try to preserve, such as Manningham Mill, or Hunslet Mill should be seen as monuments to the working classes - and by monuments I mean that in the old meaning of the word - as memorials and gravestones.Poverty for the working classes has historically been normal, and in some parts of the world it still is, we are lucky as its really only the last three or four generations that have had freedom from hunger and cold.As recently as the early 1960's we were sending children born out of wedlock to Australia, seized from their unfortunate mothers, and the roots of the childrens home on Street Lane are closely associated with the workhouse. Thank you very much for that interesting post.I'm not too far from Horsforth Woodside so I don't mind being Woodsider for a day.
wiggy
Posts: 1088
Joined: Tue 26 Jun, 2007 9:39 am

Postby wiggy » Sun 13 Jan, 2008 5:18 pm

electricaldave wrote: Oh poo!That message was directed at Parksider i don't know about 50yrs or 4 generations...i remember frost on the inside of the windows and having my grandads old over coat on the bed...in the 70s!
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy?

CookieB
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu 20 Mar, 2008 10:58 pm

Postby CookieB » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 4:38 am

trying to contact Jeff N from Perth.used to flat with him, Tommy & Pete (from Scotland)Ross/Anita ICL, Sunday footy results at West perthCookie B
...go forth I will back thee...
wiggy
Posts: 1088
Joined: Tue 26 Jun, 2007 9:39 am

Postby wiggy » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 4:41 am

CookieB wrote: trying to contact Jeff N from Perth.used to flat with him, Tommy & Pete (from Scotland)Ross/Anita ICL, Sunday footy results at West perthCookie B ?
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy?





Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests