R.A.F aerial photography over Leeds in 1951.

Bunkers, shelters and other buildings
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tilly
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Post by tilly »

Well Phill You have started a thread that I think could beat the sculls thread I did not think that was possible well done.We will see if I am right.
No matter were i end my days im an Hunslet lad with Hunslet ways.

yorkiesknob
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Post by yorkiesknob »

The cricket pitch became Archie Gordon Leeds schools rugby league ground. All the schools rep games and big finals played here. The other rugby pitches was the home ground of Headingley RUFC. Now part of Leeds Rhinos Academy .
Where there's muck there's money. Where there's money there's a fiddle.

Phill_dvsn
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Post by Phill_dvsn »

Just had a look how much change has taken place on the edge of Roundhay Park over the years. The area around North Lane mostly. One big house called Eller Close has practically had new houses built on it's doorstep. Full size photo herehttp://tinyurl.com/nda7zktJust to get your bearings, the spire visible at the top left of the photo is St John’s Church next to the almshouses on Wetherby Road. Braim wood school would be built, and knocked down again in the passing of time since this aerial photo was taken. Viewed full size Lake View cottage can be seen hiding behind the trees opposite the church. Lake View cottage is better known today As 'Goat Farm' Most Leeds residents visiting Roundhay Park remember the 'Goats milk for sale' sign on the gate. That old sign I recall from the 70's can still be seen on the same gate today. The hill and field has been mentioned before on S.L as being one of Leeds great sledging hills on snow day. Also mentioned on Secret Leeds before is the narrow footpath seen running towards the bottom of the photo. At one time this old footpath ran from Oakwood Lane to Wetherby Road, no trace of this footpath survives today, mostly new houses have been built on top of it. But I think someone posted a photo where the ginnel came out on Wetherby Road opposite the old open air swimming pool?Eller Close is the substantial stone built house in the middle of the photo.Afternoon tea and scones on the lawn, I think this photo is about as English as it gets! The Eller Close estate included a lodge, cottage, outbuildings, gardens, paddock and land extending to over 11 acres. The house still stands today, but Oakwood Green and new houses stand on the once sprawling estate.I find that comparison rather shocking to see!View of the paddock adjoining Eller Close.Two women and a small boy are watching the horse, foal, and cattle. When Eller Close was sold in 1931 it had been in the Kitchin family (owners of Cliff Tannery in Meanwood Road) for many years. In the sale particulars it was described as an 'extremely beautiful residential estate' with over 11 acres of land. Also sold as part of the estate was a 'small plot of well placed building land in Foxglove Avenue.' Laurence Kitchin had been forced to sell Eller Close due to serious ill health. It had been bought by his father, Matthew, between 1881 and 1891. Nowadays the house, located at number 50 North Lane is divided into 6 flats.            
My flickr pictures are herehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!

Phallica2000
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Post by Phallica2000 »

Unrelated to the thread...but please add yourself to this on Facebook.https://www.facebook.com/groups/1383188 ... f=tsCheers, guys.
Young 'uns that have no interest in the history of the place they grew up in....disgraceful.

Phill_dvsn
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Post by Phill_dvsn »

I've just sorted the Bradford photos out on a new flickr account just for these aerial images. There is quite a lot of railway locations that no longer exist, and also out to Esholt with some views of the sewage works railway here if anyone wants a look http://tinyurl.com/p9xosfv    
My flickr pictures are herehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!

Cardiarms
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Post by Cardiarms »

The building on the far left of the Esholt picture is part of the plant that extracted the lanolin from the sewage and sold to the cosmetics industry, this helped reduce the running costs. The site of the lagoons is covered with a composting and energy generation site, using sewage to make electricity, this helps reduce the running costs. In the field above the lagoons you can just make out two posts. They're still there. They are 'hollow pillars' about 10ft tall. No-one knows what they were for, the possibly had lights in them to guide people to the house but no road is known to have passed through them.    

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Leodian
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Post by Leodian »

In earlier pages in this thread there are mentions of the Paddy Train that ran to and from the coal pits around Templenewsam. In the 'Times Past' section on page 16 of the YEP today (Nov 2 2013) there is a mention of the Paddy Train line that ran from Waterloo Pit to the coal staith at the junction where Easy Road, Cross Green lane and South Accommodation Road met. The report has a photo showing people (not miners) in open carriages of a train taking during the 1970s. I would be surprised though if that "grim view from the windows at Temple Newsam during the 1970s" would actually be seen so readily from Templenewsam House.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.

TASMAN
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Post by TASMAN »

Photo 5 on Flight Line 4 appears to immediately precede Photo 1 on Flight line 2. Green Lane School is the common landmark and appears at the top, just left of centre on 4/5. The Church and schoolroom in the centre of 4/5 is St Mary of Bethany which was situated in Tong Road just above the Crown Cinema the white front of which stands out. Oldfield Lane is the prominent road on the right.Thanks Phil for what you are doing. I was brought up in Wortley and These photographs have solved many argument points as well as reviving old memories.

Phill_dvsn
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Post by Phill_dvsn »

TASMAN wrote: Photo 5 on Flight Line 4 appears to immediately precede Photo 1 on Flight line 2. Green Lane School is the common landmark and appears at the top, just left of centre on 4/5. These photographs have solved many argument points as well as reviving old memories. Well spotted noticing Green Lane school on both photos there. I had to check I hadn't split one flight line up when you mentioned it, but I hadn't. Flight line 2 heads towards Oakwood, and flight line 4 finishes up at York Road and the Torres. I initially thought flight line 2 started well into the City, where as the others started out in the suburbs. It does seem Green Lane school was the location they started the camera off again. I'm not surprised it solved a few arguments, it was one of the most changed areas in Leeds.     
My flickr pictures are herehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!

TASMAN
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Post by TASMAN »

Points of interest regarding Flight 2 Photo1Within the inner square of Green Lane School can be seen the flat roofed Air Raid Shelters. These were retained after WW2 and were used for storage purposes. I don't know when they were finally removed but they were still there in 1952 when I left for West Leeds Boys High. The flat roof on the building in the top left hand corner of the school was the result of bomb damage in WW2 which had to be quickly repaired so that the least disruption would be caused.The street to the left of the school is the Thirteenth avenue and the two white lines across this street were a line of flush stones which marked the position of a WW2 Static Water Tank which by the time of the photograph had been removed. The Thirteenth Avenue, like the rest of the Avenues, was cobbled, but in this section when the Tank was removed they were replaced with tarmac. This was very popular for roller skating.

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