The Railway Pub Rodley/Calverley Bridge

Old, disused, forgotten and converted pubs
LS13
Posts: 131
Joined: Fri 23 Mar, 2007 1:31 pm

Postby LS13 » Tue 29 Apr, 2014 9:11 pm

Obviously its an old building but looking on Old-maps.co.uk the first reference I can see to it being a pub is 1934. The previous map is 1921 and though the building is there, its not referred to as 'PH'. The 1934 map is the first one with the Ring Road bridge on, so could it be that the building only became a pub when the new road over the canal and river were built? There's an old photo inside which seems to have been taken outside the pub which certainly seems to pre=date the 1930's, which is a bit confusing.Anyone know anything of the history of the building and when it became a pub?
simong
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Joined: Sat 08 Sep, 2007 6:17 am

Postby simong » Wed 30 Apr, 2014 12:35 am

There is a thread about the Railway here: http://www.secretleeds.com/forum/Messag ... tMessage=0 but it's not about its origins, except the fact that there were a lot more buildings down there before the station closed.I would have said that the building has something to do with the group of buildings of a similar age in the Clariant complex and if it wasn't a pub before 1934 it would be something to do with the canal - possibly dock offices or something like that.
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uncle mick
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Postby uncle mick » Wed 30 Apr, 2014 1:09 am

The problem trying to find pubs on old maps I think arises because they were only marked PH if they had a full licence. The Railway Inn was possibly a beerhouse which were not markedAssuming this to be the same "pub" an article from the Bradford Observer April 21 1871
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LS13
Posts: 131
Joined: Fri 23 Mar, 2007 1:31 pm

Postby LS13 » Wed 30 Apr, 2014 10:17 pm

uncle mick wrote: The problem trying to find pubs on old maps I think arises because they were only marked PH if they had a full licence. The Railway Inn was possibly a beerhouse which were not markedAssuming this to be the same "pub" an article from the Bradford Observer April 21 1871 Must be the same pub so you're right, it must have been a pub/beer house then but not shown on maps. What was the difference between a licenced pub and an unlicenced beer house?Also interesting that they carried out the inquest at the pub which was presumably the nearest building to the place the body was found? Was that standard practice then rather than take the body to a hospital?

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uncle mick
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Joined: Wed 14 Jan, 2009 6:43 am

Postby uncle mick » Thu 01 May, 2014 12:18 am

LS13 wrote: uncle mick wrote: The problem trying to find pubs on old maps I think arises because they were only marked PH if they had a full licence. The Railway Inn was possibly a beerhouse which were not markedAssuming this to be the same "pub" an article from the Bradford Observer April 21 1871 Must be the same pub so you're right, it must have been a pub/beer house then but not shown on maps. What was the difference between a licenced pub and an unlicenced beer house?Also interesting that they carried out the inquest at the pub which was presumably the nearest building to the place the body was found? Was that standard practice then rather than take the body to a hospital? Beerhouses & public houses were both licensed, the basic difference between them was that a beerhouse could not sell spirits. Beerhouses originated with the Beer Act 1830, the idea behind this was to keep the working classes off the gin.It was common to hold inquests in beerhouses & public houses. I assume in the case in question the body would have been taken to hospital & the inquest held asap.
Mark S
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Postby Mark S » Fri 02 May, 2014 6:46 pm






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