The Fenton Hotel.

Old, disused, forgotten and converted pubs
drapesy
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Postby drapesy » Sun 25 Mar, 2012 8:57 pm

Cardiarms wrote: http://www.letsmovegroup.co.uk/commerci ... fenton-his.. Interesting stuff cardiarms- that confirms what I thought .I'm sure that research will show that the area around the Fenton,( and also Thwaite gate where the other Fenton was)belonged to the Fenton family at one time. The article specifially mentions Hunslet and Woodhouse Hill(which is in South Hunslet,not far from Thwaite gate,rather than the Woodhouse area)    
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chemimike
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Postby chemimike » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 1:49 am

In the 1861 census the building housing the Fenton is named Fenton House, and is not a licensed premises, but occupied by Mary Ann Wood, a teacher of singing with a pupil and domestic, her husband being not present. I cannot seem to find it on the 1851 census, though thec 1850 OS map shows that the building was there then, It is probably not relevent that in the 1853 Whites directory there is a Miss Isabella Fenton living at 112 Fenton St, especially as someone else is living there in the 1851 census
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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 1:45 pm

I wonder if the village of Church Fenton has any connection with the Fenton family?
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Jogon
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Postby Jogon » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 1:50 pm

The name means a village with a church in fen or marshland.Recorded along with nearby Little Fenton as Fentun in the Domesday Book.So I was told by long dec'd relatives out there.ps Hi Leo

PC - Dublin
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Postby PC - Dublin » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 2:43 pm

If my memory serves me right in the more recent past (late 1970's) there was an attack on the pub from right wing extremists. What made the case interesting is that it was the people who were drinking in the Fenton that were charged for using "excessive force" (or words to that effect) on their attackers.PC
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liits
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Postby liits » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 8:47 pm

dERvXeroX wrote: I've been trying to research the history of this pub for the new management. I've been a regular there for about 20 years. I've not managed to find much online apart from pictures in Leodis and some old maps.Does anyone know the history of this place or could point me in the right direction?No-one seems to know when it was a hotel.I assume it was built in the late 1800's around the time they built the housing estate that was replaced by the university campus.There used to be a barracks nearby. To get you started......The first, second and third licensees of the premises were [sort of] related.The first licensee was John Milner [b.28th October 1810 Leeds] a bricklayer who gained a [2 Guinea] Beer House license in the 1850’s. He is listed in the 1849/50 Sears & Roebuck, 1851 & 1853 White’s Directories at No 31 Woodhouse Lane. There is a little hint in the Leodis photo 2003311_31452578 although the caption, which states “It was built in 1853 and is still open today” is wrong inasmuch as it was already the Milner family home and had possibly been a beer house since 1849/50 according to the S&R Directory [the accuracy of which, is questionable]. John is recorded in the 1951 census as living at the premises – employed as a Bricklayer- with his wife Elizabeth nee Banks [b.1910 Leeds] whom he had married on 1st March 1832 at St Peter’s Parish Church, and their son Samuel [b.1842 Leeds]. I’ve not been able to discover when he died but it must have been before February 1855 – as you will see.The second licensee was James Broughton. He succeeded the license upon the death of John Milner [there is no record that John’s wife ever succeeded the license].James Broughton [b.1808 Leeds] is listed in the 1857, 1858 & 1861 White’s Directories living at No 31 Woodhouse Lane and recorded in the 1861 census as living at the premises [though, numbered No. 24 in the census] with his wife Elizabeth [b.1811 Leeds], his son from his first marriage, James [b.1839 Kirkstall] and his wife’s son from her first marriage [see above], Samuel [b.1842 Leeds], and a domestic servant.He had married Elizabeth on 24th February 1855 at St George’s Church, Great George Street, Leeds. Again, I’ve not been able to discover his date of death.The third Licensee is Samuel Milner [b.1842 Leeds], son of the aforementioned John and Elizabeth, he is listed in the Jones 1863 Directory and 1866 White’s Directory. As I have not been able to discover the date of death of his step-father, I don’t know if he succeeded the license because his step-father died or retired.The license is succeeded sometime between 1866 and 1870 by James Tymm [b.1832 Hazlegrove, Cheshire]. Listed in the 1870 White’s Directory &1872 Porter’s Directory, his name would later become synonymous with the Tymm’s Hotel, Woodhouse Lane [which stood approximately where Kitson College was / is].The renumbering of Woodhouse Lane takes place sometime between 1872 and 1875. Tymm’s entry in Porter’s 1872 Directory is listed at No 25 while the 1876 McCorquerdale’s Directory records the number as 161.The description of the premises as a “Hotel” is a bit of a moveable feast. As a rule of thumb, premises describing themselves as a “Hotel” were generally those which held a full publicans license. Beer Houses tended to be signed as “Inn” or “Tavern”. The title of hotel did not necessarily mean that it provided any form of lodgings. Many Beer Houses styled themselves as Hotel if they gained a Wine License. The Fenton was a Beer House with a Wine License [the wine license being “grandfathered” in with the 1872 Act] so maybe this is where the Hotel portion of the name comes from. Prior to 1872 and its Licensing Act, the dates of tenure of the licensees is very difficult to establish. Only with the enactment of the Act were dedicated licensing panels set up and compelled to keep accurate records. Those records can be found in the archive at Sheepscar and will enable you to complete the remainder of the licensing history of the Fenton.
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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 8:58 pm

Jogon wrote: The name means a village with a church in fen or marshland.Recorded along with nearby Little Fenton as Fentun in the Domesday Book.So I was told by long dec'd relatives out there.ps Hi Leo Thanks Jogon. As to my query wondering if the village of Church Fenton had a connection to the name Fenton I've just noticed that Si asked about Church Fenton in a post yesterday. I try to be sure to read posts but I clearly missed that part. Apologies to Si.
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liits
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Postby liits » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 9:19 pm

chemimike wrote: In the 1861 census the building housing the Fenton is named Fenton House, and is not a licensed premises, but occupied by Mary Ann Wood, a teacher of singing with a pupil and domestic, her husband being not present. From the Leeds Mercury October 5th 1855    

Si
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Postby Si » Mon 26 Mar, 2012 9:44 pm

Leodian wrote: Jogon wrote: The name means a village with a church in fen or marshland.Recorded along with nearby Little Fenton as Fentun in the Domesday Book.So I was told by long dec'd relatives out there.ps Hi Leo Thanks Jogon. As to my query wondering if the village of Church Fenton had a connection to the name Fenton I've just noticed that Si asked about Church Fenton in a post yesterday. I try to be sure to read posts but I clearly missed that part. Apologies to Si. Don't worry, Leodian. It happens to me all the time. (Missing posts, that is.)
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uncle mick
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Postby uncle mick » Tue 27 Mar, 2012 3:45 am

I have just noticed that in the 1911 census The Fenton had 11 rooms,probably enough for a few paying guests. The rooms mentioned probably don't include the public areas as it says (on the attachment) "do not include warehouse, office,shop"    
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