Perseverance Iron Foundry

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GeeWhitham
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Joined: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 6:04 am

Postby GeeWhitham » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 3:46 pm

I am interested in any information on the Perseverance Iron Foundry, Burley. This was run by my 4 * great grandfather John Whitham until his death in 1823. Then by his sons Stephen and Joseph until 1850, when Joseph and his son John took over. Stephen went on to form Monk Bridge iron works. John died in 1852 followed by his father in 1854 when the business was taken over by his younger son Joseph and was eventually sold to Greenwood and Batley in 1885. I am particularly interested in whether there are any remains of the original iron foundry still in existence. Apparently a rail connection to the GNR was introduce in 1890 of which there may still be traces.Graham Whitham
Graham Whitham
simonm
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Postby simonm » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 3:57 pm

Whereabouts in Burley was it?    
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Si
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Joined: Wed 10 Oct, 2007 7:22 am
Location: Otley

Postby Si » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:06 pm

Hi Graham,Where exactly was the foundry? I've been looking for the Cardigan Place you mentioned in your other post (Infamous sons and daughters of Leeds) but can't find it. I haven't heard of it before, and it doesn't appear on Autoroute, either. Apart from the more well-known Cardigan Road and Lane, there was a group of streets running south off Kirkstall Road further west from the railway and gas works called Cardigan Grove, Avenue, Terrace, Mount, View, Crescent (it wasn't - it was straight!) and Row - but no Place. They are now under the leisure complex. The only foundries I can find in the area on the 1908 OS map are called Scotch Foundry and Leeds Forge, but they are both south of the river, although they do have their own branch from the Midland Railway. Albion Works (which became Greenwood and Batley's) was the factory next door to Leeds Forge. Drapesy may be able to help - I think he lives in Burley.            
Si
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Location: Otley

Postby Si » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:28 pm

Here's the 1908 map showing the Cardigan back-to-backs. Cardigan Lane is top centre, and Cardigan Road runs north/south to the east of the railway. The P.H. opposite Cardigan Terrace is the Cardigan Arms, still there and still open (ask Cardiarms!!!) Hmmm...having trouble posting pictures...AGAIN!Will try again tomorrow.    

Si
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Location: Otley

Postby Si » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:34 pm

This is the area (not really Burley) to the south of the map (above) showing the gas works and foundries. The railway bottom left is the Midland Railway line.Or rather it isn't...posting problems...GRRR!    
Chrism
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Postby Chrism » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:41 pm

This is on wikipedia... ... ...Thomas Greenwood and John Batley first set up their business in 1856, both having previously worked at Fairburn’s Wellington Foundry in Leeds. Their first premises, the Albion Foundry, was taken over from Thomas W. Lord. The foundry was located on East Street by the River Aire (Aire & Calder Navigation), however this quickly became too small for their needs and in 1859 they constructed the Albion Works in Armley Road, Leeds. In 1885 the company branched out into Flour and Oil Milling Machinery as a result of the acquisition of the business of Joseph Whitham, Perseverance Iron Works, Kirkstall Road, Leeds. By 1888 the works covered eleven acres and employed around 1600 men. A rail connection with the Great Northern Railway was installed in 1890 to bring in raw materials and to deliver finished products.See here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwood_&_Batley
Sit thissen dahn an' tell us abaht it.
Si
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Joined: Wed 10 Oct, 2007 7:22 am
Location: Otley

Postby Si » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:50 pm

Cheers, Chris.According to the trusty map, there was an oil works on Kirkstall Road on the other side of the river and canal from Leeds Foundry. I'm presuming this oil works was originally the Perseverance Foundry then?Incidentally, the Wellington Foundry was also on Kirkstall Road, nearer the city centre.    
Si
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Joined: Wed 10 Oct, 2007 7:22 am
Location: Otley

Postby Si » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 4:51 pm

Maybe the clue to the whereabouts of Perseverance Foundry is in the rail connection. A GNR line ran between the Aire and Leeds Liverpool Canal from their sidings by Wellington Bridge (near Monk Bridge Works.) On the old map, this branch bridges the river and terminates in a large building on Kirkstall Road marked "Corporation Yard" and it's not far from the main NER railway and gas works.    

GeeWhitham
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Joined: Mon 24 Nov, 2008 6:04 am

Postby GeeWhitham » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 5:15 pm

Referring to my other post on Infamous sons and daughters of Leeds. The homes of William and Harriet Dove and Jane Whitham were in Cardigan Place. The book Murder, magic Madness states that "Cardigan place was a small development situated away from the main settlement, next to the railway and near the gasworks and the Perseverance Iron Foundry" The Leeds Inteligencer of 8th March 1856 states of the death of Harriet Dove "The deceased lady was the wife of Mr Wm Dove, Cardigan Place, Kirkstall Road, Leeds" Clearly these back to back houses were demolished sometime later. The inquest into the death of Harriet Dove was opened then adjourned by the Leeds Coroner Mr John Blackburn at the Cardigan Arms. Kirkstall Road. I hadn't realised that the Cardigan Arms was still in existence!I am pleased at the level of interest.
Graham Whitham
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Postby ads » Mon 24 Nov, 2008 5:47 pm

Perseverence Iron Foundry was on Kirkstall Road opposite the Radio Aire studios, where the old Fosters Stearine works were before they were turned into industrial units.





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