Forum:  Buildings and structures

Thread:  Schofields Department Store - 1980s Photos


MexicoChris (User)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 13:59:14.
Used to love going to Schofields as a kid in the 1980s, my dad used to work there, used to go on Saturday mornings shopping with my mum.. Over 21 years now since the store closed on the Headrow and the site re-developed into the present shopping center.
Here's a few photos and bits I have saved. Hope you enjoy - if anyone has any comments/memories or other pics please add to this thread!

Store Manager - Brian Bradbury


Bridge connecting main store with 1967 extention (Food Hall/Home Furnishings) 1985


Food Hall 1985


Lands Lane Enterance 1985


Staff Identity card 1980s


Store just after closure & re-location to Briggate - 30th Aug 1987


1930s Buildings - King Charles Street prior to demolition - 30th Aug 1987


Main store viewed from NCP Car Park - 1st Sep 1987


Rooftop workshops looking from tower block - 1st Sep 1987


Rooftop workshops looking from tower block - 1st Sep 1987


View from Headrow once demolition work started/ scaffolding erected - 6th Sep 1987


Asbestos removal in Patio Self-Service restaurant Home Furnishings Center (formerly Cafe Royal) 6th Sep 1987


Lands Lane view of store - 6th Sep 1987


View looking from Patio Restaurant rooftop garden at main store demolition 18th October 1987


View of Store Headrow - 22nd Nov 1987


View of site from Home Furnishings Center - 8th November 1987


1951 Jubilee Book


1980s Publicity shot


1983 Christmas Catalogue


Cover of Staff House Magazine 'Scan' from 1984 featuring Thrust car which was on display on the ground floor main store that year


Cashiers office - Auction Sale 27th Aug 1987


Cashiers office - Auction Sale 27th Aug 1987


kierentc (User)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 14:14:35.
what a blast from the past! i didn't realise there was a 30s section of the store, i just remember the main 60s bit

thanks for sharing Regular Smiley


Trojan (User)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 14:20:33.
Fascinating stuff. Especially the cashier's office - I've often wondered what was at the other end of the pipes.
Chrism (Administrator)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 14:37:48.
Excellent stuff, some memories there!

Brandy (User)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 15:07:19.
WOW brilliant stuff,i had forgot about the time i went to see the thrust car at Schofield's.
Thanks for sharing theseRegular SmileyRegular SmileyRegular SmileyRegular Smiley
chameleon (Administrator)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 19:14:26.
Brandy wrote:
WOW brilliant stuff,i had forgot about the time i went to see the thrust car at Schofield's.
Thanks for sharing theseRegular SmileyRegular SmileyRegular SmileyRegular Smiley


Yes, was only talking about that thoe other day Brandy, remember it being very long and sleak with amazingly small front wheels.

These pictures really bring back more memories - they seem to fill in some of the gaps in the original Schofields thread I think, thats here for those who didn't see it -

http://www.secretleeds.co.uk/forum/Messages.aspx?ThreadID=1105&HighLight=1


MexicoChris (User)   Posted on: 23-Nov-2008 21:27:47.
kierentc wrote:
what a blast from the past! i didn't realise there was a 30s section of the store, i just remember the main 60s bit

thanks for sharing Regular Smiley


IIRC the part of the store that adjoined the former King Charles pub on Lands La/King Charles Croft also pre-dated the 1960s buildings, probbably earlier than 30s infact. The Croft self-service Cafe in the 1930s bit of the main store was opened well before the rebuilding programme. Does anyone remember the distinctive orange dining chairs? There was also the Patio Restaurant opened on the site of the Cafe Royal in the Home Furnishings center in the late 1970s which overlooked a rooftop garden. The staff canteen was called the 'Green Room' as it was situated on the site of what was the green room of the old Hippodrome Theatre which the building replaced as an extention to the home furnishings center in 1967. The Food Hall used to be where Argos is on Albion Street (have some pics somewhere) but relocate to the newly extended store. The stores were connected by the two-story bridge link but also had a corridor in the basement for staff linking them which I can remember walking down. There was also a very strange lift called a paternoster which was like a continous lift with no doors for staff use only in the 1967 Home Furnishings extention. The multi-story car park was added arround 1974 in a joint venture between Schofields & NCP.
Other stores were located in Sheffield (opened 1972/closed 1982) Harrogate (former Debenhams on James St - No Hoopers) and the former Ledgard & Wyn in Skipton. The Warehouse was on Cross Green Industrial Estate
Peter Schofield retired and sold out to London based Clayform Properties in 1984 who re-located to the former Woolworths building (now House of Fraser) on Briggate in summer 1987. Unfortunatly Peter Schofield passed away a few years ago.
Si (Administrator)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 07:57:45.
Great pictures, MexicoChris! Thanks for sharing them. Fascinating shots of the other end of "the tubes," and glimpses of Beatties, now gone.

Cardiarms (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 08:12:02.
I can remember going for a bun in the cafe. Wlaking back through the carpet section some kid was larking around and his dad laid down the law in a booming voice, "Barrington, desist!"

The old shop looks a lot smarter than the shopping centre there now.
Si (Administrator)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 08:29:58.
In the third picture of the food hall, is the doorway on the right the back entrance to the Albion Street multi-storey car park?
There are several steps leading down to pavement level in there, and the entrance used to have a security gate, closed of an evening. The gate fitted against an iron bar which was hinged on the wall, about head-height. One morning, the gate had been opened, but the bar was accidentally left in place. I parked my car, and exited the car park. The next thing I knew, I was laid flat out on me back on the pavement outside this entrance, wondering where the hell I was, with a bloody great red whelt across my forehead. I can still see the little birds flying in a circle around me bonce!


LS1 (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 09:58:22.
Si wrote:
In the third picture of the food hall, is the doorway on the right the back entrance to the Albion Street multi-storey car park?
There are several steps leading down to pavement level in there, and the entrance used to have a security gate, closed of an evening. The gate fitted against an iron bar which was hinged on the wall, about head-height. One morning, the gate had been opened, but the bar was accidentally left in place. I parked my car, and exited the car park. The next thing I knew, I was laid flat out on me back on the pavement outside this entrance, wondering where the hell I was, with a bloody great red whelt across my forehead. I can still see the little birds flying in a circle around me bonce!

Ow!

So the car park that is there now is the one that was build prior to the demolition of the old Schofields?
simonm (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 10:37:07.
Cracking thread. Glad to see Thrust car there. I remember going to see that, just seeing the size of the air intake at the front blew me away (no pun intended) Regular Smiley

Brings back a lot of childhood memories..



BLAKEY (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 11:29:22.
What an incredible set of fabulous pictures which I'm sure everyone appreciates greatly. Of course we "seniors" can clearly remember with affection the old original store (1940s 1950s) which just proclaimed good taste and the family influence - in all seriousness the kind of store on which "Are you being served??" was based.
As others have said it is fascinating to see the "other end" of the Lampson Paragon tubes for the "torpedoes" containing the cash and receipts. For those working in the cashier's office it must have been almost akin to being in the trenches with those things thudding and rumbling all the time. A glimpse in your pictures also of Barkers Music shop shortly after its transfer from Lands Lane/Albion Place.

On the same theme but less grand was Hitchins, corner of Kirkgate and Briggate - now you really could imagine "Young Mr. Grace" being in charge there.
Chrism (Administrator)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 11:45:35.
BLAKEY wrote:
What an incredible set of fabulous pictures which I'm sure everyone appreciates greatly. Of course we "seniors" can clearly remember with affection the old original store (1940s 1950s) which just proclaimed good taste and the family influence - in all seriousness the kind of store on which "Are you being served??" was based.
As others have said it is fascinating to see the "other end" of the Lampson Paragon tubes for the "torpedoes" containing the cash and receipts. For those working in the cashier's office it must have been almost akin to being in the trenches with those things thudding and rumbling all the time. A glimpse in your pictures also of Barkers Music shop shortly after its transfer from Lands Lane/Albion Place.

On the same theme but less grand was Hitchins, corner of Kirkgate and Briggate - now you really could imagine "Young Mr. Grace" being in charge there.


Cashdisia was the same for me as a kid, I always wondered where me mams money went to and who put the change in it.


simonm (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 12:47:10.
Cashdisia, bloody hell. That brings back memories
Brandy (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 13:30:15.
Them Cashdisia are (imho)the epitome of what this site stood for when i was a kid lolRegular Smiley i was often puzzled and even spent endless hours gazing into space on the way home on the bus just wondering what was at the other endRegular Smiley.......................................and now i know lol.

simonm (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 13:36:00.
The pipes that use air to transfer money around the shops is still in use in Costco. Not so much of a puzzle anymore, but as a kid I was amazed to see the shuttle, full of money get sucked out of the hand of the cashier, to be replaced, just as quickly with an empty one, or one full of change etc.

Chrism (Administrator)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 14:18:58.
simonm wrote:
Cashdisia, bloody hell. That brings back memories


Cashdisia 1982


    


Chrism (Administrator)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 14:23:16.
Cashdisia 1932
MexicoChris (User)   Posted on: 24-Nov-2008 18:53:36.
simonm wrote:
Cracking thread. Glad to see Thrust car there. I remember going to see that, just seeing the size of the air intake at the front blew me away (no pun intended) Regular Smiley

Brings back a lot of childhood memories..



Yeh, that's the door and that's the multi-story car park that was built about 1974 that's still there now. The old enterance to the Schofields store goods loading bay & goods lift is still there on Albion St, as is the original Food Hall (now Argos)


simonm (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 09:39:04.
The orginal food hall entrance was BEHIND where argos is now, down the alley!

And from what I remember the thrust car was in the open doorway of the Headrow!    
simong (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 09:55:04.
simonm wrote:
The pipes that use air to transfer money around the shops is still in use in Costco. Not so much of a puzzle anymore, but as a kid I was amazed to see the shuttle, full of money get sucked out of the hand of the cashier, to be replaced, just as quickly with an empty one, or one full of change etc.



Most Morrisons (or maybe ones of a certain age - Yeadon and Horsforth certainly do) have an air tube system for moving money around even now, as do a lot of Tescos of a similar vintage. They're used for moving money around securely rather than for carrying out transactions.

More impressive, and I'm sure that someone will remember if a store in Leeds had one, were the chain driven systems that would propel the tubes along open rails across the ceiling. Hodgson and Hepworth in Doncaster had one until refurbishment in the mid-70s and Arding and Hobbs in Clapham in London used theirs until the store was absorbed into Allders in the early 90s.


BLAKEY (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 10:12:23.
[quotenick="simong"]
simonm wrote:
The pipes that use air to transfer money around the shops is still in use in Costco. Not so much of a puzzle anymore, but as a kid I was amazed to see the shuttle, full of money get sucked out of the hand of the cashier, to be replaced, just as quickly with an empty one, or one full of change etc.

[/q0ote]

More impressive, and I'm sure that someone will remember if a store in Leeds had one, were the chain driven systems that would propel the tubes along open rails across the ceiling. Hodgson and Hepworth in Doncaster had one until refurbishment in the mid-70s and Arding and Hobbs in Clapham in London used theirs until the store was absorbed into Allders in the early 90s.


I remember the wonderful "overhead cableways" very well from my younger days as lots of shops had them - in fact the vacuum pipeways were more usually to be found only in bigger establishments. With the overhead system the little cash containers would swing merrily from side to side as they were "thwacked" on their journey by a polished wooden handle near the counter. In some grocery stores where, can you believe it nowadays ??, huge blocks of butter etc were laid unwrapped and open on the counter for days on end until sold out. These were a free playground for flies, wasps and so forth, and over lubrication of the cash cableways could mean that the odd drop of nice black oil would drop unceremoniously onto the food. In modern times we have a different problem as excessive protective packaging is causing a massive recycling/disposal problem. Funny old World isn't it ?
Si (Administrator)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 10:29:36.
It certainly is, Blakey.
Bring back milk bottles! (And other re-usable containers.)
Why use waxed cardboard milk cartons (difficult to recycle,) which are effectively single use, when a milk bottle can be washed, sterilized and refilled many times at a fraction of the cost to the environment!
Re-use is even better than recycling.
We once had a customer who would only buy new plastic drums because he said reconditioned ones, stacked in his yard, would "offend his eye!" Berk!!!    


simong (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 10:38:22.
BLAKEY wrote:

I remember the wonderful "overhead cableways" very well from my younger days as lots of shops had them - in fact the vacuum pipeways were more usually to be found only in bigger establishments. With the overhead system the little cash containers would swing merrily from side to side as they were "thwacked" on their journey by a polished wooden handle near the counter. In some grocery stores where, can you believe it nowadays ??, huge blocks of butter etc were laid unwrapped and open on the counter for days on end until sold out. These were a free playground for flies, wasps and so forth, and over lubrication of the cash cableways could mean that the odd drop of nice black oil would drop unceremoniously onto the food. In modern times we have a different problem as excessive protective packaging is causing a massive recycling/disposal problem. Funny old World isn't it ?


My Mum worked in Burton's in Nottingham in the 60s (big town centre grocers, no relation to Monty and family as far as I know) and told me that one of her morning jobs was to cut the mould off the cheese and clean the bacon. I'm sure that would give the average Tesco manager palpitations these days.
Si (Administrator)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 10:39:38.
Must have taken her ages to get the mould off the Stilton!

BLAKEY (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 10:40:25.
Si wrote:
It certainly is, Blakey.
We once had a customer who would only buy new plastic drums because he said reconditioned ones, stacked in his yard, would "offend his eye!" Berk!!!    



LOL LOL A berk indeed !! It brings to mind Hyacinth Bucket's instructions to the milkman that in future she wanted her own personal bottles as "there are some very funny people around these days." LOL LOL
Reginal Perrin (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 11:04:47.
I just get the headings of the pictures and no pictures. Is there any way I can adjust my setting s to view the pictures?

tyke bhoy (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 11:42:28.
Reginal Perrin wrote:
I just get the headings of the pictures and no pictures. Is there any way I can adjust my setting s to view the pictures?

Can you see the Avatar of Rigsby next to your name? And images from elsewhere?

It may depend on which web browser you are using and as the photos are hosted on photobucket that site may be blocked on your network and/or PC.

See if you can load http://photobucket.com/

If you can then as a start got to start>settings>Control Panel and double click on internet options. Select the advance tab (far right) and scroll down to Multimedia (about half way) Ensure "show pictures" is ticked.
simong (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 12:30:05.
Si wrote:
Must have taken her ages to get the mould off the Stilton!


If you take all the mould out of Stilton you're just left with a pile of Wensleydale.


Reginal Perrin (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 13:00:28.
tyke bhoy wrote:
Reginal Perrin wrote:
I just get the headings of the pictures and no pictures. Is there any way I can adjust my setting s to view the pictures?

Can you see the Avatar of Rigsby next to your name? And images from elsewhere?

It may depend on which web browser you are using and as the photos are hosted on photobucket that site may be blocked on your network and/or PC.

See if you can load http://photobucket.com/

If you can then as a start got to start>settings>Control Panel and double click on internet options. Select the advance tab (far right) and scroll down to Multimedia (about half way) Ensure "show pictures" is ticked.


Thanks, photobucket is indeed, blocked at work. Boo.
chameleon (Administrator)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 17:15:12.
Reginal Perrin wrote:
tyke bhoy wrote:
Reginal Perrin wrote:
I just get the headings of the pictures and no pictures. Is there any way I can adjust my setting s to view the pictures?

Can you see the Avatar of Rigsby next to your name? And images from elsewhere?

It may depend on which web browser you are using and as the photos are hosted on photobucket that site may be blocked on your network and/or PC.

See if you can load http://photobucket.com/

If you can then as a start got to start>settings>Control Panel and double click on internet options. Select the advance tab (far right) and scroll down to Multimedia (about half way) Ensure "show pictures" is ticked.


Thanks, photobucket is indeed, blocked at work. Boo.


SL is considered a 'news board' at work and thus not being on the white-list is just altogether....blockedSad    


Trojan (User)   Posted on: 25-Nov-2008 21:46:59.
simong wrote:
simonm wrote:
The pipes that use air to transfer money around the shops is still in use in Costco. Not so much of a puzzle anymore, but as a kid I was amazed to see the shuttle, full of money get sucked out of the hand of the cashier, to be replaced, just as quickly with an empty one, or one full of change etc.



Most Morrisons (or maybe ones of a certain age - Yeadon and Horsforth certainly do) have an air tube system for moving money around even now, as do a lot of Tescos of a similar vintage. They're used for moving money around securely rather than for carrying out transactions.


Morrisons Morley too.
There's a cash ball system still in use at Beamish and also a rapid wire system at Bradford Industrial Museum
http://www.ids.u-net.com/cash/locations/eng-yorkshire.htm
Geordie-exile (User)   Posted on: 26-Nov-2008 00:05:31.
The old Yorkshire Post building on Albion Street had one of these tube systems for whooshing copy from editorial to typesetting. You had to open the lids on the ends of the tubes and 'pump' air so that stuff didn't get stuck in the tube.

In the 'new' Yorkshire Post building on Wellington Street there was originally a type of rubber conveyor belt in which you trapped the copy and it whizzed away to be typeset or whatever.    


'Arry 'Awk (User)   Posted on: 26-Nov-2008 16:15:12.
Geordie-exile wrote:
The old Yorkshire Post building on Albion Street had one of these tube systems for whooshing copy from editorial to typesetting. You had to open the lids on the ends of the tubes and 'pump' air so that stuff didn't get stuck in the tube.

In the 'new' Yorkshire Post building on Wellington Street there was originally a type of rubber conveyor belt in which you trapped the copy and it whizzed away to be typeset or whatever.    


Hi G-E!
Weren't those vacuum tube systems made by a firm called
Lamson Paragon? I recall using these in RAF Signal centres
in the 1950's (Swing that lamp!). One instance springs to mind
was of a certain Group captain controller who,Not being used
to the system, Stuck a message form into the receptor
WITHOUT first putting it in the canister ! Groupy's
job was to pass messages to the signals office upstairs
so that the wireless ops could transmit the message to
aircraft in flight. The message he had stuck in the tube was to recall a patrol Shackleton aircraft over the Atlantic. First anyone knew
was a very irate Shack pilot urgently requesting a recall to base as he was very low on fuel! They found the recall message wrapped
lovingly round the inside of the LP tube! I must add that this all happened on a Nato Exercise and proved that the excercises weren't a waste of time. Like most of us on that unit,poor old
Groupy was only there on a fortnight's detachment. Probably
never seen the inside of a signal office before! Bet his face was red
in the Mess that night!





Geordie-exile (User)   Posted on: 26-Nov-2008 22:39:33.
'Arry 'Awk wrote:
Geordie-exile wrote:
The old Yorkshire Post building on Albion Street had one of these tube systems for whooshing copy from editorial to typesetting. You had to open the lids on the ends of the tubes and 'pump' air so that stuff didn't get stuck in the tube.

In the 'new' Yorkshire Post building on Wellington Street there was originally a type of rubber conveyor belt in which you trapped the copy and it whizzed away to be typeset or whatever.    


Hi G-E!
Weren't those vacuum tube systems made by a firm called
Lamson Paragon? I recall using these in RAF Signal centres
in the 1950's (Swing that lamp!). One instance springs to mind
was of a certain Group captain controller who,Not being used
to the system, Stuck a message form into the receptor
WITHOUT first putting it in the canister ! Groupy's
job was to pass messages to the signals office upstairs
so that the wireless ops could transmit the message to
aircraft in flight. The message he had stuck in the tube was to recall a patrol Shackleton aircraft over the Atlantic. First anyone knew
was a very irate Shack pilot urgently requesting a recall to base as he was very low on fuel! They found the recall message wrapped
lovingly round the inside of the LP tube! I must add that this all happened on a Nato Exercise and proved that the excercises weren't a waste of time. Like most of us on that unit,poor old
Groupy was only there on a fortnight's detachment. Probably
never seen the inside of a signal office before! Bet his face was red
in the Mess that night


'i arry awk

I'm not sure of the make but it was a vacuum system and did involve canisters. It was rather noisy. As I was saying, the tubes had ends or lids which you had to prise open due to the suction and bang a few times to clear blockages, rather like putting the shovel on the fireguard and covering the fireplace with newspaper to get the fire going. [There's another thread!]

Wonder how the got the paper out of the tube? All this has reminded me of, 'Send three and fourpence, we're going to a dance'. Bet you've heard that one arry?


'Arry 'Awk (User)   Posted on: 27-Nov-2008 16:51:29.
IGE!
Aye, A' wo' theer. up to me neck in muck and bullits,
when this horficer cums up and sez,'I say,Private, relay this message verbally to the command post. " send Reinforcements,
We're going to advance" Orft I goes thru shot and shell and
reports to the CP orficer, ' Sir, 'B' Coy. Captin Says
" Send Three and fourpence,we're going to a dance!"
I was put on a charge for insurbordination!
(That the one u mean?)
Geordie-exile (User)   Posted on: 27-Nov-2008 23:09:21.
'Arry 'Awk wrote:
IGE!
Aye, A' wo' theer. up to me neck in muck and bullits,
when this horficer cums up and sez,'I say,Private, relay this message verbally to the command post. " send Reinforcements,
We're going to advance" Orft I goes thru shot and shell and
reports to the CP orficer, ' Sir, 'B' Coy. Captin Says
" Send Three and fourpence,we're going to a dance!"
I was put on a charge for insurbordination!
(That the one u mean?)


That's the one 'Arry! Laugh Knew I could rely on you.


tartanyorkie (User)   Posted on: 12-Apr-2009 15:53:15.
Great pictures which bring back memories. I used to work in the office where the other end of those tubes came out. Very noisy but after a while you only noticed them if they were turned off! Handy for sending money about but I could never understand why some documents were crammed in so you nearly tore them trying to get them out.    
brownage (User)   Posted on: 17-Oct-2009 16:49:19.
These are absolutely brilliant, I worked there from school to work in the ticket office and also helped with the window dressing. We had such brilliant times. Remember Mr Bradbury very well and a great gentleman. There still isn't to this day a store which was as friendly and great to work in like that.

I've actually still got my blue S badge and also the anniversary program featured in the picture which is great. Remember a lot of the people in the picture of the racer as well.

Wonder if any of the Schofield family are still around. would be great to get in touch with anybody who remembers me Andrew Brown, I worked with Brian, Leo, marlene, Jacqui, Colin Pickersgill amongst others.

Great pics


Dobbie54 (User)   Posted on: 17-Oct-2009 17:33:57.
I remember going to the Cafe up on the top floor with my Mam.The view was fantastic overlooking the rooftops of Leeds and a good view of the Odeon.Also the first time I'd ever seen sugar cubes.Strange what you remember isn't it.
                                                                    Also remember queing for hours down the Headrow for the January sales.Happy days
Kelvinator (User)   Posted on: 31-Mar-2010 17:26:53.
I have many happy memories of Schofields. As a child in the seventies and eighties, it was the last word in civilised shopping with your mum. Somehow, it just oozed class. The restaurants, the lifts with their different coloured buttons, the menswear department in the basement, the toy shop upstairs and the quaint little food hall that always smelled of fresh coffee.

I still miss it now and I guess many others do. Lewis' too. Leeds may be the Knightsbridge of the north, but it just doesn't have department stores like it used to. You can keep Harvey Nichols. Bring back Schofields.


BLAKEY (User)   Posted on: 31-Mar-2010 18:42:10.
Kelvinator wrote:


I still miss it now and I guess many others do. Lewis' too. Leeds may be the Knightsbridge of the north, but it just doesn't have department stores like it used to. You can keep Harvey Nichols. Bring back Schofields.


I agree entirely Kelvinator. As a child in the 1940s I drool over my memories of "the original" Schofields. The lifts were wonderful aged gated types with humble smartly uniformed operators, some of whom Bless 'em were rather poor drivers and had to make several attempts at a satisfactorily accurate "landing" at the various floors.
On arriving at the original second floor restaurant in one such magnificent conveyance you were greeted by immaculate service of the highest order. First you were met by a most dignified mature lady who would enquire "How many ??" She would then, by very discreet high class "Tic tic", convey this requirement to a superb military type chap - a bit like Ronald Coleman and similar Hollywood heartthrobs of the time - and he would somehow find a suitable table in the enormous restaurant. He had an artificial arm with leather glove (no doubt a result of WW2 heroism) and was later to be seen around Leeds in the immaculate uniform of the British Legion (I think) office messengers.
That Schofields restaurant was sumptuously carpeted and the linen, cutlery and china were superb, but having said that the beautiful food was not at all expensive.
I'd hate to give the idea that I was some sort of snobbish toff in those days - my folks were very poor indeed and we could only afford to go there as a very occasional treat. I can picture the place and the characters accurately to this day and these are among many happy memories of what was, to those of my era, a very happy Leeds indeed - the cinemas, the dance halls, the theatres, the many department stores etc etc - how many remember M.C.Hitchen and Sons on the corner of Kirkgate and Briggate - well if you can't, just picture Grace Brothers and Mrs. Slocombe and young Mr.Grace and there you have it !! Happy happy days. LaughLaugh
Trojan (User)   Posted on: 31-Mar-2010 23:11:34.
BLAKEY wrote:
well if you can't, just picture Grace Brothers and Mrs. Slocombe and young Mr.Grace and there you have it !! Happy happy days. LaughLaugh

What about Mrs Slocombe's pussy? Confused


BLAKEY (User)   Posted on: 01-Apr-2010 07:41:00.
Trojan wrote:
BLAKEY wrote:
well if you can't, just picture Grace Brothers and Mrs. Slocombe and young Mr.Grace and there you have it !! Happy happy days. LaughLaugh

What about Mrs Slocombe's pussy? Confused


LaughLaughLaughLaughLaugh

Seriously though, even in times as relatively recent as Hitchen's store, such risque humour just didn't seem to be around in general - and certainly not on "Aunty BBC."
Also, apart from anything else, there was a CLAWS in the Planning Consent which prohibited the selling of such services in the Store !!
LaughLaugh
    
Johnny39 (User)   Posted on: 01-Apr-2010 15:23:43.
Geordie-exile wrote:
The old Yorkshire Post building on Albion Street had one of these tube systems for whooshing copy from editorial to typesetting. You had to open the lids on the ends of the tubes and 'pump' air so that stuff didn't get stuck in the tube.

In the 'new' Yorkshire Post building on Wellington Street there was originally a type of rubber conveyor belt in which you trapped the copy and it whizzed away to be typeset or whatever.    



I still have a yard of that conveyor belting on my fishing box at the back of the garage.


purplezulu (User)   Posted on: 01-Apr-2010 22:43:56.
Cardiarms wrote:
I can remember going for a bun in the cafe. Wlaking back through the carpet section some kid was larking around and his dad laid down the law in a booming voice, "Barrington, desist!"

The old shop looks a lot smarter than the shopping centre there now.



Barrington, desist LaughLaugh I don't think I am ever going to stop laughing after reading that ha ha

What a fantastic set of pictures - i have been browsing this site for a while now but missed those completely. A real treat to see where all those magic tubes and canesters ended up - being of a curious (Ok nosy) disposition Regular Smiley
purplezulu (User)   Posted on: 01-Apr-2010 22:57:03.
Johnny39 wrote:
Geordie-exile wrote:
The old Yorkshire Post building on Albion Street had one of these tube systems for whooshing copy from editorial to typesetting. You had to open the lids on the ends of the tubes and 'pump' air so that stuff didn't get stuck in the tube.

In the 'new' Yorkshire Post building on Wellington Street there was originally a type of rubber conveyor belt in which you trapped the copy and it whizzed away to be typeset or whatever.    



I still have a yard of that conveyor belting on my fishing box at the back of the garage.


Best kind of re-cycling is that - keeping a little piece of Leeds history and putting it to good use Regular Smiley


anthonydna (User)   Posted on: 01-Apr-2010 23:42:04.
If it was from the YEP recently you would have it on your Fishing Bocks
Nell (User)   Posted on: 25-Sep-2010 08:14:16.
My dad also use to work at schofields so practically grew up in the place on the Headrow. My dad was the furniture department supervisor and used to do nightwatch somenights till about 10 for a bit of extra money.

I remember the paternosta lift, it was for staff only and my dad frequently used to get on it reading his paper and forget to get off and end up going right round it. It was a continuous lift that never stopped. It only went slowly and I presume must have been on some kind of belt cos it went down/up in a rotation. Basically if you forgot to get off youd end up at the bottom, back then top of the lift shaft and have to wait to come round to the frong again. I was scared to death of the thing and used to shut my eyes when I went on it. It was in the furniture building at the back of the food hall.

The food hall smelt amazing, the only thing I have ever found that remotely resembles the small of schofields food hall is Harrods food hall. It must be to do with the mix of the meats and cheeses and the temperature that its kept at but everytime I walk into Harrods food dept I could shut my eyes and be 5 again.

I remember the cloack rooms for the staff really well. The doors were opp where warehouse is now, frosted glass with the 'S' on them. Through the door and down a few steps where 2 guys used to stand behind the counter and behind them lots of dark green metal shelving with numbers on. Staff used to take their bags to them, the guys would put them on a shelf and give them a tag in return.

That place was part of growing up for me, i loved every minute of being there. Thanks for those photos, fantastic reminder.


Nell (User)   Posted on: 25-Sep-2010 08:22:08.
Ooooh!! does anyone remember the santas grotto at schofields. They were always in competition with Lewis's over the road lol.

I remember one year they always put the grotto at the back of the kids dept... logocally. But when i was about 7 so maybe xmas of 79, they did this grotto which was amazing to me as a child. It was a long black room all lit up with fairy lights, there were little buildings and models of villages and they hung glass baubles from the ceiling on nylon. There were just hundreds of baubles, all lit up to make them look like bubbles. It was the most magical grotto i had ever seen and still have acutally cos they are total pants these days. But it was the most magical place i had ever been when I was 7.
exiled in essex (User)   Posted on: 17-Oct-2010 17:53:19.
What brilliant photogaphs - I used to love going in Schofields as a child, it was the 'posh shop', we always believed it to be posher than Lewis's! Not that Lewis's wasn't posh but Schofields was posher.

I used to work with a woman who told me that she used to take her fur coats to the fur department in Schofields and they had a service where they would store them for you over the summer, in the correct conditions, and you'd collect them when the weather became colder and you wanted to wear them again.

You just couldn't imagine that nowadays but an awful lot of ladies owned a real fur coat or two back then!


45man (User)   Posted on: 17-Oct-2010 19:09:34.
I have a memory as a child being mesmorised by some type of huge machine in the entrance by the lifts I think.

If I recall correctly you had to put money in it,but for the life of me can't remember what you got in return.

Anybody else know what I'm on about,or have I lost the plot completely!.
STICKS (User)   Posted on: 17-Oct-2010 20:36:40.
Hey mexico chris that brought back many happy memories when my late mam use to take me into town great well done .

jaycee (User)   Posted on: 13-Oct-2013 15:02:34.
Hi everyone,I worked at schofields in the 70s and 80s.I remember mr Bradbury he was a proper gent.I worked in lots of departments .I worked for the infamous MISS PAGE on perfumery.I loved it.I have the brass plate taken from the entrance when it was demolished.I remember Shirley who worked underground were the lamson tubes were sent.In the posted picture of staff is linda who worked on Revlon,denise salmon from gift dept,bernice and Margret from handbags.When I started there I was lunchtime staff.I moved around the depts. filling in.There was Lesley fraser,Murial smith wensley,joan shields,and botty.We used to dread photography because we didn't know what the hell we were talking about.The boss on photography was joe liversedge and his wife pat worked on stationery.They were great times ,I couldn't wait to go to work.
Johnny39 (User)   Posted on: 13-Oct-2013 15:50:42.
I can remember in the cafeteria they did a "Blue Plate" and a "Green Plate" but I can't remember what the difference was. Can anyone help?

brownage (User)   Posted on: 14-Oct-2013 20:19:09.
I remember all those people. those were great times. I worked in the ticket off and Display department with marlene, Leo, Gordon. Had some fantastic times and absolutely loved working there. Such a shame that it closed down.

brownage (User)   Posted on: 14-Oct-2013 20:21:27.
Not too sure about the blue plate and green plate. I think it had something to do with having salad with your meal or not.

I remember the paternoster which was unique, still got a few memorabilia from schofields. There will never be another store like that again.

Such a shame


LS1 (User)   Posted on: 15-Oct-2013 08:18:37.
jaycee wrote:
Hi everyone,I worked at schofields in the 70s and 80s.I remember mr Bradbury he was a proper gent.I worked in lots of departments .I worked for the infamous MISS PAGE on perfumery.I loved it.I have the brass plate taken from the entrance when it was demolished.I remember Shirley who worked underground were the lamson tubes were sent.In the posted picture of staff is linda who worked on Revlon,denise salmon from gift dept,bernice and Margret from handbags.When I started there I was lunchtime staff.I moved around the depts. filling in.There was Lesley fraser,Murial smith wensley,joan shields,and botty.We used to dread photography because we didn't know what the hell we were talking about.The boss on photography was joe liversedge and his wife pat worked on stationery.They were great times ,I couldn't wait to go to work.


Chance of a pic of the brass plate for us to see on here?
brownage (User)   Posted on: 15-Oct-2013 09:06:28.
Mr Bradbury was a great guy to know and definately a gent. I worked as part of the team in advertising and window displays with Lynsey, Paul, Brenda and then there were us in the ticketing office. Those machines were massive and very old hahah. There was also Gordon, Marlene, Leo. Sale times used to be absolutely manic with the sale window displays and thousands of sale tickets we had to print.

Particularly remember the staff canteen area it was huge and don't think there are many companies nowadays that provided a full canteen service nowadays. Everything was always imaculate in the store and met some fantastic people. The best job I ever had was working there straight from school. Obviously we were sold to House of Fraser..........a completely different world and I hated it from day one.

I remember the last day in particular myself and 3 others with barrows running down from the building with dummies cos we didn't have any for the displays, it was hilarious.

Great times and would be great to get in touch with anybody who remembers me.

Andrew Brown


geoffb (User)   Posted on: 15-Oct-2013 09:15:58.
Johnny39 wrote:
I can remember in the cafeteria they did a "Blue Plate" and a "Green Plate" but I can't remember what the difference was. Can anyone help?



I think it was the cups and saucers that were green and blue, green you got one cup of coffee and blue you got two cups, all served at your table by smart waitresses.
Johnny39 (User)   Posted on: 15-Oct-2013 17:35:58.
geoffb wrote:
Johnny39 wrote:
I can remember in the cafeteria they did a "Blue Plate" and a "Green Plate" but I can't remember what the difference was. Can anyone help?



I think it was the cups and saucers that were green and blue, green you got one cup of coffee and blue you got two cups, all served at your table by smart waitresses.


I think perhaps you're right Geoffb. It was a long time ago and the memory does become distorted. It was a lovely cafeteria and an equally lovely department store and, on the odd occasion, I shared a drink in Moortown R.U. club with Peter Schofield, a very nice man.