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R.A.F aerial photography over Leeds in 1951.
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R.A.F aerial photography over Leeds in 1951.
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 14:50:44.  


I've just been given this great box of never seen before aerial photos of Leeds.



The photos in question were taken by the R.A.F in 1951. The only clue to the date being the Festival of Britain celebrations taking part on Woodhouse Moor at the time. The R.A.F were given the task of photographing every inch of the United Kingdom. A bit like a forerunner to our modern day google earth if you like. It was to establish the countries logistical capabilities like coastal defences, rail yards, and production as Britain began to take stock after W.W.2 and prepared for 40 years of cold war. The aerial photos were taken from a nose camera mounted in a Canberra plane. The plane flew in straight lines back and forth. It looks to have taken a photograph every one or two seconds.

This huge collection of photos were going to be destroyed. The RAF was pretty much going to incinerate all archives that were over 50 years old. Fortunately someone working at the archives realised their importance and kept the tins of film for the Leeds and Bradford areas.

                        
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 14:52:52.  





Yorkshire Evening Post article 9th October 2013.

The photos were shot on high quality Zenith film to show good clear detail when blown up.
The photo plates are the standard 10'' squares seen below, but I also have some 17'' x 11'' prints from them. By 1951 the R.A.F were pretty much on top of their game as far as aerial photography was concerned. By the end of the war they'd photographed every inch of Nazi Germany and most of Europe under gun fire. I guess this exercise was like a walk in the park for them. All the photos below are in flight order as the plane took them. As far as the RAF were concerned, these images never existed - but they were declassified in any case.    
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:07:12.  




*East End Park, Marsh Lane, Quarry Hill, Lovell Park, University, Woodhouse Moor, Headingley and Horsforth*

The photos below were taken on dedicated aerial reconnaissance cameras and film capable of being exploited at great magnification. Perfect quality for spotting your enemies entrenched troops and tanks, you can almost see Monty scrutinising similar photos of Normandy to see where his old adversary Rommel had his fortifications along the Atlantic wall.

Leeds almost looks toy town on some of the images, perfect detail for any model railway builder.
I like the fact there is such good detail down to street level. You can clearly see the cars, buses, trams, trains and people going about the City. Pub signs, and signs of the companies and business's trading at the time can clearly be deciphered. Many of those pubs and companies ceased trading a long time ago. It's almost like looking back at a day in the life of 1950's Leeds captured as it happened. It's interesting to see how many allotments, gasometers, and prefabricated houses there was across Leeds in the 1950's. Many of the areas captured no longer exist. Some of the locations are instantly recognisable, others have changed beyond all recognition. All the buildings look soot blackened, chimneys of belching smoke around the industrial areas of Hunslet, Kirkstall and Armley. These photos are a great historical record of our City as it was back in the day.

**The photos can be viewed full size by clicking the link below each photo**

Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/px5unen

This photo shows the bottom part of Neville Hill train depot at East End Park This is a bit of a rarity as far as photos go. The rarely documented 'Paddy train' railway line can be seen running past the allotments. The Paddy train used to cross the road near to The Bridgefield pub where a man in a little wooden hut used to come out and stop the traffic with a red flag when the train came.

The flagman’s name was Sam Bowden who was a well know character in East Leeds. He was a very likable man and would pass the time of day with the locals. Sometimes he would invite them into his cosy shed in the winter, which would by warmed with a constantly fuelled stove. There was always the chance of a pot of tea to be had whilst having a chat. I think Stan's job sounds perfect, wooden hut complete with stove and kettle. You provide your own newspaper and smokes, and a pub only 20 yards away. What more could a not very hard working man want? Sadly those kind of jobs and old characters have long since gone.

The Paddy train ran from Waterloo Pit at Temple Newsam to the coal staith at the junction of Easy Road and Cross Green Lane. This train brought coal from the colliery to be unloaded at the staith at Easy Road. From there the coal was taken by coal merchants for distribution to local households and business's across the City. The Paddy train was also used to transport colliery workers to and from the pit at the beginning and end of their shift. The Paddy train last ran in 1968.

On early mornings you could hear the echo of miners pit boots walking on the cobbled streets as they went to catch the train for their shift at the pit. The first train left Cross Green Lane at 5.05 a.m taking the daily shift to the pit. The train returned at 6.50 a.m bringing back the night shift. The Paddy train would repeat this return trip twice more for the afternoon and night shifts. A ‘knocker-upper’ would probably have been used to wake up the early morning shift workers. This would normally be someone who lived in the area. He would carry a pole, perhaps a clothes prop, with this he would tap on the bedroom window until the light came on and the occupant drew back the curtains and showed his face.

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/omvfkw8

As luck would have it the little Paddy train was just about to cross Cross Green Lane as the camera plane flew overhead. Flagman Stan can clearly be seen waving the train across the road. The roof of Stan's wooden hut can just be seen on the on the other side of the allotments. The Bridgefield pub seen standing on the corner was demolished in 2010. Several streets of the the back to back houses seen on the far side of the railway cutting have also been flattened. The club house and seats of the East Leeds Cricket Club can be seen in the bottom right corner of the photo.

The path at the side of the cricket club ran from Pontefract Lane to Halton Moor Road. The path is marked on maps as 'Halton Moor Road' but it was actually made of red shale and resembles a track, the track was known locally as red road. The road had a gate house called Neville Cottage, it can be seen on the photo standing on it's own. The cottage belonged to Leeds City Council, and was in a state of disrepair by the 1980's. The elderly chap who lived there was entitled to live there rent free by virtue of being the gate keeper, but hardly anyone ever used the gate for access. L.C.C refused to carry out repairs on the cottage because they wanted to force the elderly chap to move out so they could demolish the cottage. The elderly gent died in the 1980's, and the Council moved in indecent haste to knock the cottage down.

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pj7c36g

Looking down the huge railway cutting through Richmond Hill. This line was opened in 1834 and was one of Britain's first main lines, and the first main line to be built in Yorkshire. Passengers were afraid to travel through the tunnel when the line first opened. The tunnel quickly gained a bad reputation due to locomotive smoke and the total darkness within it's confines. Whitewash and copper reflectors were added inside to try improve lighting and make it less of a frightening experience for passengers.

The impressive structure of Mount Saint Mary's stands tall above Richmond Hill. The church can be seen in the top left of the photo. During the 1970's and 80's the congregation dwindled and the cost of keeping the church open wasn't feasible. Mount St Mary's closed it's doors for the last time in 1989. The church has stood empty ever since. The church stands in a very sad state of decay today.

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nhpyauq

Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oqb7wd7

Eventually the line was widened to four tracks and the tunnel opened out in 1894.
The opening out of the tunnel resulted in the most impressive civil engineering along the line. Here the deep cutting has a series of impressive cross bridges spanning the railway. Most of the industrial buildings on top of the short tunnel still stand today. But the rows of back to backs on the left of the photo have been bulldozed. The lost streets had peoples names like Walter Crescent, Ada View, Nellie View, Bertha Street and Harry Crescent to name but a few. A school and playground can be seen built to one side of the tunnel. The school is marked off on the 1894 map as 'School - Boys, Girls & Infants' The smaller building was a Methodist chapel. Those streets and buildings were all pulled down in the mid 1960's.

St Patrick's church can be seen on the corner of York Road in the top right hand side of the photo. The much missed Woodpecker pub can also be identified. It's surprising to see the York Road area looking so empty. Light industrial buildings built in the 1960's and 70's now stand in the area of land between Shannon Street and York Road. The buildings look very ugly along Shannon Street, they always remind me of buildings you would see in the New York area around the meat packing district. The type of locations that always featured in the 1970's gritty American cop programs like Kojak. The Ebor Gardens housing estate was built on the far side of York Road in the 1960's.

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qaydg8e

Marsh Lane goods yard and Quarry Hill flats, both long since demolished.
Marsh Lane was originally the terminus for the Leeds and Selby railway. But it was soon considered to be too far out of the City. So in 1869 the viaduct that runs between the Parish Church and the bus station was built. The new City station was opened to replace the terminus at Marsh Lane. The site of the old terminus was used as a goods yard until the 1960's, and continued to be in use by Tilcon concrete until the 1990's.

Quarry Hill flats when built in 1938 were considered state of the art living, no more outside toilets in back yards for these lucky tenants. The flats replaced much of the old housing stock demolished during the widespread slum clearances in the City. The imposing flats fell into a state of decay and were demolished in 1978. The flats were made famous as the location for the 1970's sit com 'Queenie's Castle' featuring Dianna Doors. The sitcom is remembered with affection by many Leeds Loiners to this day. It is also said that Adolf Hitler had plans to use the flats for his headquarters when Germany invaded Britain. Fortunately the R.A.F stuck a resolute two fingers up at Hermann Goering and his Luftwaffe and Hitler never got the chance.

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/okvtkxs

The huge girder bridge across the railway that connected Shannon Street and Railway Street has since been demolished, a much smaller bridge has now replaced it. I used to walk over that bridge for three years in the early 1980's whilst going to school. It was a huge bridge with very high sides. A perfect location for an errant schoolboy to have a crafty smoke whilst watching the Tilcon train loading in the old sidings below. Upon leaving school my entire collection of school books went over that bridge, regardless of being told I needed them to revise for my Summer exams still pending. The only thing I learned of any merit at school was to take no notice of people intent on telling you what to do. Needless to say I failed my exams in spectacular fashion Regular Smiley

A few of those old sidings are still visible in the vegetation and wasteland of this once important railway location. Marsh Lane station can be viewed on the photo, the station closed to passengers in 1958. But the overgrown crumbling platforms of the station still survive. The large church of the right of the photo was St Mary's at Mabgate. Despite the church being demolished by the late 1970's, the old steps to the church can still be seen opposite the City of Mabgate pub.

Photo 8.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ozx8zqq

The bottom part of Leeds market can be seen behind the bus station. Fire destroyed the whole bottom half of the market on the 13th of December 1975 at closing time. I remember seeing the huge fire as far away as Seacroft.

A phenomena that seems unique to Leeds, is the ability to knock old buildings down but build nothing to replace them. The buildings seen next to the market around George Street, and Harewood Street have been demolished for decades. I can't recall anything standing on that land going back to the early 1970's. The area has been a dirt and gravel pot holed car park for nearly 40 years. The Market Tavern pub, better known in Leeds as 'The Madhouse' still stood on the corner of Harewood Street until it was demolished in 1995. A row of market buildings lined George Street, but they too were demolished soon after, ever since this prime land location has been an eyesore. It remains to be seen if the plans for the much talked about Harewood Quarter ever come to fruition

Leeds bus station as built in the 1930's would be remodelled again, the bus stands were altered again in 1963, but the main 1930's concourse, shop kiosks, ladies waiting room, and toilets were kept. During the 1970's this bus station was a pretty grim and scary place to be. It made the space port of Mos Eisley seem friendly in comparison. Many a drunk, and down and out tramp would sleep on the undercover benches through the night, and they would swear, shout, and generally harass the passengers by day.

The old Millgarth Police station can be seen next to the 'bookend buildings' at the bottom of Eastgate. Originally Millgarth Police station was built with it's own mortuary. If that wasn't grim enough, there was an abbatoir behind the bus station. It seems incredible to think that cattle would be herded through the City Streets. Herds of cows would be marched down York Street, driven along by several drovers with long sticks.

Photo 9.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p522e8w

It's surprising to see on this photo that the bottom half of Eastgate wasn't complete by 1951. Looking at it's architecture, I always assumed it would have been built in the 1930's. It's unclear when the buildings were finished. But peoples memories seem to suggest it was in the late 1950's. The curved building on the corner where the bus is turning was the Marquis of Granby public house. I recall the pub being open in the 1970's, but I can't remember exactly when it closed. The pub has been a job center for many years, a closer inspection above the doorway still reveals the 'Marquis of Granby' sign.

Photo 10.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pxbhqnz

York Road can be seen running at the side of Quarry Hill flats. The road looks very different today, a concrete flyover has replaced the roundabout on Regent Street. The new flyover was built by Shand Construction in the late 1960's. Viewed full size the City of Mabgate pub can be seen on the right of the photo. One of my Sunday dinner time watering holes until it closed in 2005. The Mabby is one of Leeds much missed real ale pubs, now sadly turned into flats. Fortunately the green Burmantofts tiles and pub sign have been retained on the exterior. A row of Nissen huts can be seen on the roof of Lewis's, these huts were actually a temporary furniture store from 1949.

Photo 11.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/np7golg

Photo 12.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q2pebmk

The layout to this area looks very different today. Many of the buildings on the photo were demolished to make way for the Inner Ring Road in the 1960's. North Street is the main road running from left to right, Lovell Park is also visible. The houses running up the side of the park were on Brunswick Place that was demolished to make way for the curved slip road that circles round the Caspar Flats today. The land where the Nissen huts are is marked as a military drill ground as far back as 1891 on old maps, by 1931 it appears as Gibraltar Barracks (Territorial) The drill hall can be seen at the top of the field. The Merrion Center would dominate the top of this photo today.

Photo 13.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nro23jm

Perhaps one of the saddest aspects of the Inner Ring Road construction was the demolition of these fine buildings at the end of New Briggate. The half timbered mock Tudor houses were built in 1901, in a style similar to places like York and Chester. The detail of these aerial photos is superb, a tram can be seen travelling along North Street, and a Swan Vestas sign above the roof of the old Public Dispensary. That building still survives on the corner of New Briggate and Vicar Lane. The curved building at the top of the photo was Brunswick chapel, It survived until the mid 1980's.

The above photo depicts a very busy area with shops galore. But today it's only a place you really pass through, It's a very soulless, and dead area of the City. I've often seen photos of those demolished buildings, but I've never really been able to place exactly where they were until now. I've added a comparison Then and now photo below to make it easier to locate.

Photo 14.



They call it progress, but I know which scene I prefer.
The many roof top statues and carvings are also a part of hidden Leeds. As we rush about we often fail to see what's right above our head. Despite passing this statue countless times, it's the first time I've noticed it while looking at these photos. The statue in question is actually Queen Victoria, the statue was placed there in 1837 when she ascended to the throne. Customers of the Wrens public house across the road refer to her as ''The Mighty Skylord - Goddess of cheap travel and last minute flights''

Photo 15.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/o2t77g3

If it wasn't for the sheer dominance of the Parkinson building at Leeds University, the bottom part of this photo reminds me of the aerial photos of the damage to Dresden in 1945 for some reason. The buildings look shell like, the windows blacked out, almost like all the glass has been blown out. But what the Luftwaffe didn't destroy, the City planners soon would. Most of the buildings at the bottom of this photo were cleared to make way for the Inner Ring Road. Viewed full size, the spire of the smallest church in the middle of the photo is Blenheim Baptist Church on Blackman Lane. Everything below Blackman Lane was wiped off the map in the 1960's. Blenheim Primary school and play fields would take up much of the bottom half of this aerial view today.

Photo 16.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oofe83x

Not very much change has taken place in this area over the years, The two churches in the triangle are still standing. The nearest being Trinity St Davids Congregational Church, and the taller church behind is the Emmanuel Centre, Leeds Universities Chaplaincy. The tip of the Emmanuel Centre spire is actually an Ordnance Survey intersected station trip point. The new Leeds College of Art on Blenheim Walk, and Eldon Court student accommodation behind, and the Faculty of Engineering are really the only new additions to this scene today.

Photo 17.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nhcngsy

The Festival of Britain was taking part on Woodhouse Moor when these aerial photos were taken. The Festival in Leeds ran from the 23rd June to the 14th July 1951. It was opened by the Princess Royal. So the date these photographs were taken can be narrowed right down. The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition held throughout the United Kingdom in the summer of 1951. It was organised by the government to give Britons a moral boost and feeling of economic recovery in the aftermath of W.W.2. This photo is zoomed in from some considerable distance. It was taken from the Lovell Park area. That's amazing sharp quality for 60 year old pre-digital photography. Spitfires can be seen parked on the grass, the larger white planes behind were Avro Lancasters. War time prefab houses can be seen built on the St Marks streets.

Photo 18.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/no9qmxg

The only big change to this photo, is in the bottom half before Woodhouse Moor. The graves were in the Leeds General Cemetery (also known as Woodhouse Cemetery) The cemetery closed in 1969. The cemetery chapel in the middle of the grave yard is grade II listed and was retained, but contractors for the university moved in and removed most of the headstones. Some of the headstones went to Leeds City Museum, others were simply covered over with soil. Only a few headstones remain in what is now a public open space called St Georges field. Fortunately the grave of Pablo Fanque survives. Pablo Fanque was mentioned in the Beatles song "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite" from the LP Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. More information about Pablo Fanque can be seen here
http://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/2498822207/

The houses to the right of the cemetery were swept away to make room the Leeds Universities Faculty of Engineering building. The Henry Price residencies building has today replaced the row of houses along Clarendon Road. I was surprised to see the park looking so unkempt at first, on closer inspection you can see it is full of war time 'Dig for Victory' allotments.

Photo 19.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ovpqt89

Only a 100 yards further on from the above photo, the special reconnaissance camera in the plane captured another image of Leeds. I would think the camera took a photograph every second to make sure it captured every part of the landscape. It would need to be very quick regarding the speed the plane was going. This image just captures the end of Woodhouse Moor and another scene that hasn't changed too much over the years. The main church visible was the Woodhouse Moor Methodist Church, that stood on the corner of Hyde Park Road and Brudenell Road. The church was demolished and has since been replaced by flats. The church spire behind belongs to St Michael and All Angels on the corner of Headingley Lane and St Michael's Road. The Arndale Center would be visible behind that church today.

Photo 20.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p6wcdez

Looking down the neat terrace houses on the Welton and Hessle streets that still stand today. The main road seen cutting through the middle of the photo is Victoria Road. Buildings belonging to the Leeds Girls High School can just be seen on the right of the photo. The school on the far left of the photo was Brudenell Council School on Welton Road. The old school was demolished in 1990 and replaced with a modern primary school. Headingley Rugby League and Yorkshire Cricket Club ground is in the distance on the left.

Photo 21.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ovondlg

Terrace houses on the Richmond and Manor streets make up the front of this photo. The home of Leeds Rhinos and Yorkshire County Cricket behind.

Photo 22.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nj4r5cu

The new Carnegie Pavilion at the Kirstall Lane end would be visibly on today's aerial image. The South Parade Baptist Church still stands today seen at the junction of Cardigan Road and Kirkstall Lane.

Described by the 'Mystery Worshiper' to be a red-brick Edwardian Baptist Cathedral. A warm Welcome to Headingley, hallowed home of Yorkshire cricket. The church is virtually opposite the Test and County Cricket ground. Student bedsit land gives way here to suburban semis. George Orwell stayed in one of the terraces nearby en route for Wigan Pier.
A mix of the prosaic and the bohemian, Headingley is home to some of the best fish and chip shops in the world!!

Photo 23.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pr6nktm

I'm glad the plane flew in straight lines over Leeds, it makes finding these locations much easier. By using google earth you can pretty much plot the actual flight path the plane took. By finding location landmarks from earlier photos, you only need to strike a line in the direction the plane was heading to find these mystery locations, It works every time.

Despite priding myself on knowing a lot of Leeds, this location would really have stumped me.
This 1951 photo looks very rural, compared today's landscape here. The plane has just passed the Beckett Park Campus and Queenswood area of far Headingley. This photo shows the actual construction of Queenswood Drive, Queenswood Close and Ghyll Road. The line of trees running up the center of the photo is Spen Lane. The little Hamlet of dwellings seen on Spen Lane are marked on maps as Spen Hill Farm and Abbey View. The roundabout on the left of the photo is Lea Farm Drive. The large area of earthworks was A.R. Briggs & Co Woodside Quarry.

Photo 24.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/olchf6p

A more detailed view of Spen Hill Farm and Abbey View can be seen here, these buildings have vanished to make way for new build properties. The Leeds - Harrogate railway passes in front of the quarry, the bridge carrying Butchers Hill over the line can be seen on the top right of the photo. The curve of Hawkswood Crescent can be seen behind the Quarry, and the chimney of Horsforth Mill can be seen which still stands today.                                
My flickr pictures are here
http://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/

Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
User



Location:
Leeds
Joined on:
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Posted:
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:17:09.  





*Armley, Sheepscar, Chapletown, Harehills, Gipton Woods and Oakwaood Lane*



Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qz78wm7

This area overlooking Armley has changed so much, it's probably easier to add a modern day aerial image above to help get your bearings. You can just see the railway roundhouse on wellington Road at the top of the photo on the right. The large imposing building at the bottom of the photo was in fact Green Lane school, a Methodist Chapel can be seen behind on Skilbeck Street. The Armley Gyratory has swept much of the area away where the gasometers stand, and new housing has replaced all the old back to backs.

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pdw8at3

I found the amount of railway sidings on this photo very confusing at first, fortunately the soot blackened Town Hall can be seen in the distance to pin point these locations. It's also the first time I've seen an aerial photo of this area of Leeds from this direction. The two lots of railway sidings look closer together, and far more extensive from this direction. The far railway sidings have been wiped off the map altogether, and only four running lines remain on the section of railway nearest the bottom of the photo. The far sidings were known to railwaymen as Montague and Gotts yard. These rail yards are covered better on another flight path, I'll add more details to those photos instead of these.

The industrial buildings at the bottom of the photo were part of the Leeds Corporation Gas Works, on closer examination you can see a curved railway siding ran into the gasworks from the nearby mainline. The line crossed over Canal Road at this point, you can still see a gap in the railway wall where the Gas Works siding ran today. The A647 Canal Road leading up to the gyratory now dominates this view. Armley Road still runs parallel to the railway line, but most of those old buildings along it have been replaced by modern industrial units. The tall mill building next to the canal is Castleton Mills, a grade 2 listed building that has been refurbished. It's quite a nice walk along the canal in that area today, canal boats are often moored in the area, and fisherman take advantage of the pollution free waters now around Leeds.

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p6zwsbw

Yet another view that will have you scratching your head trying to place where it is. A whole swathe of this area was wiped off the map when the Inner Ring Road was built. This is the area at the bottom of Kirkstall Road just before the Yorkshire Evening Wellington Bridge flyover. The nearest road running from left to right is Kirkstall Road, the large building at the bottom of the photo was Wellington Foundry. The main road running through the middle of the photo is Burley Street where it joins Park Lane. Marlborough Towers now stands on the empty land, and if you view the photo full size you can see the Highland pub on Rutland street. The Highland pub is one of only a few buildings to survive today. Hanover Square can also be seen, with the towers of the Civic Hall in the distance.

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ofsg5r5

This photo was probably the hardest of the lot to identify the area with all the changes over the years. The location is Woodhouse Lane where the new 'rusty' Broadcasting Place building stands. The Inner Ring Road construction in the 60's obliterated the buildings on the right of the photo. Blenheim Baptist Church can be seen on the corner of Blackman Lane, and opposite the church the back of the Fenton pub can be seen. Carlton barracks is situated further on, a Bofor gun and anti aircraft search radars can be seen on the parade ground.

Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/okp7sb5

The R.A.F camera plane has just flown over the friendly anti aircraft search and gun battery at Carlton Barracks. The church pictured was St Matthews Church on Oatland Lane. The church and back to backs were demolished in the 1960's. Many of those back to backs were deemed unfit for habitation. In front of the Sheepscar gasometers is Meanwood Road, with some of the old mills and tannery buildings still standing. St Clements church is visible behind the gasometers, the church was situated on Chapletown Road. It was demolished to make way for the Sheepscar Interchange.

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nqhml47

Looking over Chapletown with Barrack Road being the main road visible running from left to right. The dome of the New Synagogue can be seen at the junction of Louis Street and Chapletown Road. Leopard Street can be seen running parallel to Barrack Road, all the old houses below Leopard Street were demolished to make way for the Sheepscar Interchange. I first thought the white building at the bottom of Chapletown Road was another one of Leeds lost pubs. However after doing some research I found out they were two shops. Geoffrey Simpson's grocers, and Dearden Bros Ltd Painters and Decorators at numbers 58 & 60 Chapletown Road. A good photo of the shops with old advertising signs can be seen here
http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?resourceIdentifier=2377&DISPLAY=FULL

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pj5o2cy

A vast triangle of back to back housing is formed by Harehills Avenue and Roundhay Road. Roundhay Road marks the boundary between Chapletown and Harehills, and it's not hard to see from this photo why Harehills was the most densely populated area in Europe. At one time Chapletown was a very leafy and affluent area, you only need walk down Harehills Avenue and Spencer Place to see the big old houses of yesteryear. But there has been a steady decline in the area over the years. The rich people moved further North out of the City towards the more favoured Roundhay and Moortown areas. The back to backs were built around the affluent areas effectively sandwiching it in, the big houses were later split into flats and bedsits by landlords. The area became a hotbed of drugs and prostitution from the 1970's onwards. The red light district became a favourite haunt of the Yorkshire Ripper during his reign of terror in the 1970's. Chapletown has recently seen a lot of regeneration, the notorious Hayfield pub was demolished 2002 in an effort to clean the area up and make it safer.

Photo 8.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p5mwesq

This closer view of Chapletown shows a large white building on Francis Street seen at the bottom of the photo. The building became known as the International Club. It's claim to fame was in March 1967 when Jimi Hendrix played a gig there. The club has had several other aliases since it first opened in the 1960's. Roots, Cosmo's and lastly the Phoenix Club when it reopened after a fire. The International Club was one of several dubious blues clubs, and shebeens around the Chapletown area in the 1970's and 80's. Drinking dens, like the Lamporte Club, Strega, Room at the top, and strip joints like the 148 Club attracting some colourful characters. The big school was originally called Cowper Street primary School, but has been renamed Hillcrest Primary School.

Photo 9.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/othc79m

Most of these old houses in the triangle of Harehills Avenue and Roundhay Road still survive today. The larger building seen on Roundhay Road and the corner of Sheperds Lane was the New Leeds Constitutional Club. A bowling green can be seen behind the club, during the war years a static water tank was built on the bowling green, a photo can be found of it on the Leodis website. By 1951 the water tank had been removed and the bowling green was back in use.

Photo 10.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nppnbpk

This is a good detailed view of the Clock cinema junction of Roundhay Road and Easterly Road. Here trams on the number 3 route would either carry straight on and head for Roundhay Park, or they would turn up the short spur of tracks on Easterly Road and terminate. It was intended to extend the tramway all the way up Easterly Road and head for the new Seacroft housing estate, but by 1959 the trams would sadly be a thing of the past in Leeds. The Clock cinema opened on Monday 21st November 1938 with the film 'The Hurricane' starring Jon Hall and Dorothy Lamour. It closed on Saturday 28th February 1976 with the film Incredible Journey. I recall going to this cinema a few times in the 1970's. I seem to recall one film being the Three Musketeers, and the other film I think was a 101 Dalmatians, which I wasn't too impressed with being a rough and tumble lad of that era. It wouldn't be until I saw Star Wars at the A.B.C cinema in 1977 that I would be left in awe at the big screen.

The Fforde Greene pub can be seen on the corner of Roundhay Road and Harehills Lane. The Fforde would become a premier music venue in the 60's, 70's and 80's. I recall seeing long crowds queuing up Easterly Road to see the bands on weekend evenings. Many famous bands graced the stage at the Fforde Greene before hitting the big time. The Beatles, Simple Minds, Sex Pistols, Dr Feelgood, Dire Straits, and more local bands like Be Bop Deluxe and The Prowlers to name but a few. The Prowlers are are still going strong, and can be seen in the few remaining live music venues around Leeds like The New Roscoe, and The Duck & Drake. Undesirable elements and the drugs trade moved into the pub after the nearby Hayfield on Chapletown Road was closed. The pub went down hill and was closed in 2004 after a Police raid. This once famous premier pub is now a continental supermarket. The white building in the triangle of land at the top left of the photo was the Astoria Ballroom. The Astoria was built in 1929 and formerly known as Harehills Palais-de-Danse. After its closure in 1992 it became Amrik's electrical showroom until 1995. Since then the building has been demolished and replaced by flats.

This photo to me is a stark reminder just how much home entertainment like D.V.D's, cable T.V, games consoles, computers, take away meals, and cheap supermarket booze has killed of these evening out socialising venues. All three of the featured places in this photograph have been closed, and all are an endangered species across the U.K. Pubs are closing at 26 a week, the many small local cinemas across our Cities have given way to one or two multiplex cinemas. Ballroom dancing only seems to exist at the Blackpool Tower, and on our T.V screens on a Saturday night with 'Strictly come dancing'



Copyright David Bapty.

This colour photo of the Clock cinema junction is well worth including for a street view look of the area.

Photo 11.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qbxuflh

Just past the Clock cinema is this view looking up Roundhay Road towards Gipton Woods. Two trams can be seen trundling along the reserved track along Roundhay Road, the number 3 tram went to Roundhay Park, and it returned back to the City on the Number 1 to Beeston. The last trams to run along this track was on Saturday the 28th March 1959. Copgrove Road runs parallel to Roundhay Road, next is Upland Grove, Upland Road, and Upland Crescent. The half circle of houses seen at the top of the photo is Montague Crescent.

Photo 12.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/peq92tf

Manfred Mann's 1960's hit Semi Detached Suburban Mr James springs to mind looking at the neat rows of all mod cons semis. There was nothing on this land except Gipton lodge, allotments, and fields prior to these houses being built in the 1920's. Copgrove Road can be seen running next to Gipton Woods, Montague Place is the longest road visible.

Photo 13.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qx2o69l

This area has become a lot more built up today, and at first glance it's quite difficult to tell where it is. The tree lined road running through the middle of the photo is actually Oakwood Lane. From left to right the streets of Montague Drive, Place, and Crescent can be seen meeting Oakwood Lane. Oakwood Park can be seen on the far right of the photo, the largest building visible is called Beechwood House. Montague Court was built where the tennis courts stand, and opposite new houses were built along Oakwood Lane, and Oakwood walk was constructed.

Photo 14.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nda7zkt        

This rural scene on the edge of Roundhay Park has also become more built up over the years. It's a little hard to see with all the trees, but North Lane runs across the photo. The row of houses at the bottom of the photo stand on a short street called Foxglove Avenue on old maps. Foxglove Avenue has since been extended with newer houses built on it, the three old houses seen on the 1951 photo still survive today. A narrow footpath can be seen running behind the houses on Foxglove Avenue, at one time this old footpath ran from Oakwood Lane to Wetherby Road, no trace of this footpath survives today, mostly new houses have been built on top of it.

The substantial stone built house next along was called Eller Close, the Eller Close estate included a lodge, cottage, outbuildings, gardens, paddock and land extending to over 11 acres. The house still stands today, but Oakwood Green and new houses stand on the once sprawling estate. The spire visible at the top left of the photo is St John’s Church just off Wetherby Road, the church was closed in 2008. Wetherby Road almshouses, Vicarage and lodge can be seen next to the church. Viewed full size Lake View cottage can be seen hiding behind the trees opposite the church. Lake View cottage is better known today As 'Goat Farm' Most Leeds residents visiting Roundhay Park remember the 'Goats milk for sale' sign on the gate. That old sign I recall from the 70's can still be seen on the same gate today.

The field belonging to Goat Farm was always known as Bulls Field, thanks to a 'Beware of the Bull' sign nailed to a tree. In all my years I never saw a bull in that field, I think the sign was merely an attempt to keep people off the land. The sign needless to say didn't have the desired effect, Bulls field was one of the best sledging hills in Leeds on snow days. Braim wood school would be built, and knocked down again in the passing of time since this photo was taken. The fence running along the top of Bulls field is Asket Hill where it meets Wetherby Road. The building standing on the corner of Asket Hill and Wetherby Road is marked off as a Police station on old maps, today it's a residential property.        
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:17:46.  





*Stourton, Hunslet, Holbeck, Armley and Kirkstall*

Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oa36v3b

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pc46mh2

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pk4lmbh

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q6yx9ht

Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qzplqzz

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p6e5olp

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ng2oyly

Photo 8.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q8okack

Photo 9.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pvjvcdl

Photo 10.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/p6y59oz

Photo 11.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/qef5zfr

Photo 12.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oze92vm

Photo 13.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oygxtzx

Photo 14.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pnqsr4j

Photo 15.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pesx2h2

Kirkstall Forge.

                
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:19:03.  





*Farnley, Wortley, Hunslet, River Aire, York Road and Harehills*

Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nat4778

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q5pydqo

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pmqkfa2

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q75jy3r

Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pcsc272

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nnrpex8

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/o86ywtk

Photo 8.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nkd8mao

Photo 9.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/ogcfyz2

Photo 11.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pnehne4    
        
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:19:37.  





*Churwell, Bramley, Armley and Kirkstall, Woodhouse Moor and Meanwood*

Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nv2enbg

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/peurquc

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oxc2qny

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nlwhchu

Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/olktwfb

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/orvtw54

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oo2ueag

Photo 8.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pbmdsc9

            
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:19:54.  





*Beeston, Tommy Wass, Dewsbury Road and Hunslet*

Photo 1.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oequvp2

Photo 2.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/oeu9nyj

Photo 3.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/perc3u9

Photo 4.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/py46776


Photo 5.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/nzl8acs

Photo 6.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q8hak34

Photo 7.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/pk7ntqm        
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 15:21:06.  


Right...I've got all the photos uploaded now.
It wasn't the way I wanted to do it. I'd have preferred uploading them to Secret Leeds so you could click on the photo to view them full size. The S.L gremlins put paid to that unfortunately.

I'll try get some links working under the photos so you can see them full size in a bit.

I'll also add some information about the locations, and maps e.t.c as a work in progress.
It was quite a job sorting through all the photos and making some sense of it all at first.
But I think the fact they were going to be destroyed makes it worthwhile documenting them and saving them for posterity Regular Smiley
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Leodian
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 17:33:57.  


That is a fascinating set of photos Phill. Many thanks for taking what must have been a great time and effort uploading them. Glad they were saved from being destroyed.
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 17:46:04.  


Leodian wrote:
That is a fascinating set of photos Phill. Many thanks for taking what must have been a great time and effort uploading them. Glad they were saved from being destroyed.


My pleasure Leo Regular Smiley

It was a guy who used to work at the R.A.F who got in touch with me and asked if I wanted to make use of them.
He said he was a keen model railway builder and had been using various websites for info to build his layouts.
He said wherever I looked your name popped up. I thought if these photos can go to a good home I bet that lad would use them Regular Smiley

He said you would have cried if you saw what was destroyed in those archives, everything the R.A.F ever took apparently. Some stuff going back nearly a 100 years. It was decided to sort this huge archive out and anything over 50 years old was likely to be burnt. It was our job to sort through it all and see what needed saving.

They found the actual aerial reconnaissance photos of the Möhne and Edersee Dams taken prior to the Dambuster raids. Lots of historical stuff like that was saved and went to various archives.
They tried to give the stuff that was going to get incinerated to various universities, libraries, and archives.
But when they realised how much there was of it - they simply couldn't afford the transportation!

As far as I know these Leeds photos are the only images left from the 1951 R.A.F mapping of England.

I've also put one flight path of images together on a short video.
I haven't cropped those, I've left them the same ratio the R.A.F took them.
When viewed one after the other it gives you the illusion of flying over Leeds in the actual plane.

I'll add the link to it in a while when I've got my flickr stuff sorted.            
My flickr pictures are here
http://www.flickr.com/photos/phill_dvsn/

Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Johnny39
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 17:51:25.  


Well done Phil.
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma? 
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gbdlufc
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 18:01:15.  


Cheers Phil, much appreciated, thank you.
Garry
 
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Cardiarms
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 18:06:29.  


Fascinating stuff!

It's not uncommon, before I knew od Secret Leeds and the Leodis website, in one of our sheds I found a crate full of photos of leeds taken in the 60s for LWW. The photos were mainly of manhole covers, and excavations but had loads of street scenes and incidental detail in the background. They were destroyed.    
 
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Steve Jones
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 19:45:21.  


It is stuff like this that makes Secret Leeds such a valuable resource. The many and varied interests of members help keep stuff like this around instead of being carelessly destroyed.The old saying "One man's rubbish is another man's treasure" applies often.
Steve Jones
I don't know everything, I just like to give that impression!
 
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raveydavey
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 19:46:17.  


By heck, no wonder you've been quiet for a while! Wink

A huge thanks for taking the trouble to get these images saved and posted online and for sharing them with us.

I've just spent the last 20 minutes poring over the EEP pics - another evening about to vanish Regular Smiley
Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act – George Orwell  
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tilly
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 20:12:36.  


Many thanks Phil your a star.    
No matter were i end my days im an Hunslet lad with Hunslet ways. 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 20:35:00.  


Thanks everyone, glad you like them so far.
I've got as far as adding links to the full size photos on probably half the photos.

I want to add some info and maps in time.
Make it an interesting thread. I'll send the link to Leodis and other websites if they want to use them when it's done.

But it's slow work, Secret Leeds is extremely hard to do anything like this.
Having to embed photos from hosting sites, manually create links e.t.c.
It's like using Windows 95 Shocked

But I'll get there, eventually Regular Smiley
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Loiner in Cyprus
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 20:40:01.  


What a fascinating set of photos. Thanks Phil for sharing them. Ironically, I remember more of Leeds from those photos than more up to date ones.    
 
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Leodian
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 21:15:00.  


Purely as an aside to this superb thread I wonder what aerial photographs of Leeds may still exist that were very likely to have been taken from the German airship 'Hindenburg' that flew over Leeds in 1936 (before my time, honest Tongue).
 
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liits
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# Posted on: 03-Oct-2013 21:55:09.  


Great Job, well done!
I'd never realised that there were so many prefab houses in Leeds.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/liits/
"Given enough time, a monkey - typing at random - would, as part of its output, almost surely produce all of Shakespeare’s plays". Well, the internet has pretty much debunked that myth.
 
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mhoulden
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# Posted on: 04-Oct-2013 03:40:32.  


Interesting stuff there, especially along Kirkstall Road and York Road. Leodis has lots of photos of houses taken just before they were torn down for slum clearances, but there aren't many photos taken halfway through, like the alphabet streets between Burley Road and Kirkstall Rd on flight line 5. It's also interesting seeing Kirkstall power station and the rows of houses on the site of what's now Cardigan Fields. Again, Leodis has a fair few street level photos but there aren't many aerial views that give it some sort of context of just how many there were. Holbeck is pretty unrecognisable because it's changed so many times and it'll be interesting sitting down with Old Maps to see how it compares.
 
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yorkiesknob
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# Posted on: 04-Oct-2013 05:04:45.  


Great Stuff Phil, as a ex surveyor who use to do ground control for map making from aerial photos I found these of great interest. Going to re post a couple of photos on the Burley Road group on facebook if you don't mind. Thanks again Tony
Where there's muck there's money. Where there's money there's a fiddle. 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 04-Oct-2013 06:03:03.  


Glad you find them of interest fellas Regular Smiley

Yes by all means use what you like Tony. That's why I put them on the internet.

Some of the photos are hard to recocgnise with all the changes to the areas over the years yes.
I particularly found this York Road photo confusing at first, If it wasn't for the unmistakable Star Cinema on Glenthorpe Crescent.



York Road doesn't exist as we know it today, a big space of grassland where the Torre's now stand.
The background looking pretty rural indeed.

I'm glad I've got them in flight order to scroll down, It's much easier to work out a few of the places I'm unsure about at the far parts of Armley and over Farnley. You can pretty much pin point the locations you know and find the exact line the plane flew this way. It's just a quick check on Google earth and old maps to verify then.            
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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Cardiarms
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# Posted on: 04-Oct-2013 07:51:16.  


mhoulden wrote:
Interesting stuff there, especially along Kirkstall Road and York Road. Leodis has lots of photos of houses taken just before they were torn down for slum clearances, but there aren't many photos taken halfway through, like the alphabet streets between Burley Road and Kirkstall Rd on flight line 5. It's also interesting seeing Kirkstall power station and the rows of houses on the site of what's now Cardigan Fields. Again, Leodis has a fair few street level photos but there aren't many aerial views that give it some sort of context of just how many there were. Holbeck is pretty unrecognisable because it's changed so many times and it'll be interesting sitting down with Old Maps to see how it compares.

IIRC the council condemned the alphabet streets in the 30s and started clearing them just before the war. Conflict and austerity meant that the job wasn't completed for 15 years. Most of the clearances were originally scheduled to be done in the 1940s and 50s. There must be a book about somewhere..
 
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