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Martyn
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# Posted on: 21-Mar-2007 22:54:46.  


There's an area of Leeds called 'Steander' it's between East Street and Marsh Lane where the timber merchants used to be and where the new apartments are being built. The name is a Norse word that means 'A stoney place'.
We can probably figure out how that area got named but there are a few that I can't figure out.

'Bank' just to the north of East Street where the railway line is. The nearest street is Railway Street.

'Islington' just next to Elland Road football ground.

'Potternewton' OK, newton is New Town, where's the potter?

'Little London'. What was it about this area that reminded people of London?

Any ideas?
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Loinerpete
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# Posted on: 22-Mar-2007 14:03:57.  


There was a foundry at steander. Bumantofts got its name from the norse, BURH MAN    TOFT. The burh men were so called because they were slightly high ranking and were awarded a burh...almost like an alotment....these were set aside just outside the city in tofts, the norse for field....these tofts were the tofts of the burh men.....or BURMANTOFTS, and guess were they were???
 
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wsmith
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# Posted on: 22-Mar-2007 14:14:47.  


The Tofts, which were where Burmantofts now is, were awarded to people who rented a Burgage Plot on Briggate, so it was more a money thing than a status thing (though the two no doubt went hand in hand then as they do now). This was according to the terms of the 1207 charter.
 
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raveydavey
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# Posted on: 22-Mar-2007 20:52:00.  


Bank is actually East Bank. That said, I'm not aware if there is a West Bank in Leeds?

It's nothing to do with finance, but it's simply named because it was a big bank (or hill). If you look at the railway you'll notice the enormous cutting that had to be constructed for the line pass through.

It was where many of the Irish immigrants to Leeds first settled, which is bourne out by Mount St Marys Church (largest non-cathedral church in the UK) and school and a little further afield, the Irish Centre.
Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act – George Orwell  
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Cedric
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# Posted on: 23-Mar-2007 09:53:40.  


There was an area actuallu known as Black Bank, this was nearer to York Road than the modern Bank. There is a suggestion that Black Bank got its name from coal mining in the area. If coal was mined it would have being small scale bell pit type activity not to be confused with modern coal mining.
Steander is mentioned as one of the landmarks in the survey of the 1620s survey of the Manor of Leeds.
 
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Troll
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# Posted on: 23-Mar-2007 11:03:33.  


Hi, re Potternewton, according to GEN UK at www.genuki.org.uk Potternewton is New-town, near the pottery.

Must have been a pottery there then at sometime or other, never heard of one there before though. I thought it was the landowner that gave the name to the area, could have been a potter I suppose.
Go the Rhinos. 
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Troll
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# Posted on: 23-Mar-2007 12:18:56.  


Hi, just looked up on the Thoresby Society website (www.thoresby.org.uk) that Potternewton with Chapel Allerton and Gledhow was anciently a seat of the Mauleverers. They came over with the Conqueror and were there for at least eight generations.

Info from the Thoresby Society.

Still don't know when it got its name of Potternewton, before or after the Mauleverers sat their bums on it.
Go the Rhinos. 
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Troll
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# Posted on: 23-Mar-2007 16:06:24.  


Hi, some more research has shown that the Mauleverer family may not have come over in 1066, but in about 1105. Could have been a forged family tree giving wrong info on them.

Info from GENUKI at genuki.org.uk

Giving up now.
Go the Rhinos. 
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Cedric
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# Posted on: 24-Mar-2007 12:51:25.  


Ralph Thoresby states in his Ledis Ducatus that
(Gallow Hill) On the North side of York Lane (York Road); West broom hill extending to Colcotes lane, is the Boundary of the Manor of Leeds; thence betwixt the Lands belonging to the Lordship of Potter-Newton on the North and of John Falkingham, Esq on the South; the Survey (Survey of the Leeds Manor underatken in the 1620s) directs us to a little Beck that comes from Gipton Well and thence along the Brook Westward, y Little Wil-dykes, to Sheepscar Lane and the Great Wil=dykes ... Upon the Black Bank was the Campus Sceleratus, which from its Use in former Ages, does, to this Day, reatin the name of Gallow hill, as being the place of execution before the Furca or Power of Hanging was taken away from the Lords. Whether a Pitt has been there also, to drown the Women Thieves. I cannot learn at so graet a distance of time.    
 
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Troll
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# Posted on: 24-Mar-2007 14:26:11.  


U wot?

Didn't they talk funny in them days!
Go the Rhinos. 
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TomD
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# Posted on: 17-Apr-2007 18:59:49.  


raveydavey wrote:
Bank is actually East Bank. That said, I'm not aware if there is a West Bank in Leeds?

It's nothing to do with finance, but it's simply named because it was a big bank (or hill). If you look at the railway you'll notice the enormous cutting that had to be constructed for the line pass through.

It was where many of the Irish immigrants to Leeds first settled, which is bourne out by Mount St Marys Church (largest non-cathedral church in the UK) and school and a little further afield, the Irish Centre.


there is a Westbank that I know of in Leeds... on water lane in the shadow of bridgewater place... its the name for the Halifax call centre... so this one is to do with finance.
 
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simon2710
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# Posted on: 28-Apr-2007 11:54:32.  


Little London known so because the now old fashioned high rise flats made this part of the city look like London
Simon -H- 
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drapesy
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# Posted on: 28-Apr-2007 21:50:07.  


The High rise flats date from the 60s - the name Little London is older than that. Little London is shown on the first O.S.map of Leeds in 1851 - not many tower blocks around then....
there are 10 types of people in the world. Those that understand ternary, those that don't and those that think this a joke about the binary system.

 
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Loinerpete
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# Posted on: 30-Apr-2007 10:06:35.  


Little london is indeed a very old district of Leeds, nothing to do with high rise flats, more to do with people migrating here from london in the late 1700`s looking to work in the early days of the industrial revolution. Also the area close to elland road on the lowfields was originally called islington, another london reference you could say.
 
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Reginal Perrin
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# Posted on: 30-Apr-2007 12:37:34.  


There was a village called Fleet down Fleet Lane in Woodlesford / Oulton. Absolutely no trace of it today. Apparently not that long ago either.
Ravioli, ravioli followed by ravioli. I happen to like ravioli. 
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Ian R P
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# Posted on: 19-May-2007 23:10:35.  


Hello all,

I thought Little London was so called because they built the area using building materials brought from London. Though reading this the migrant thing looks more plausible.
Potter could be a common thing for Leeds as Burmantofts Pottery is still considered to be famous and of historical importance.
 
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Scandy Bramley
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# Posted on: 20-May-2007 19:48:05.  


Burman/buurman in Germanic means neighbour...never heard the word here in Scandyland.
Although the south of Denmark and the north of Holland have very similar dialects (Friese/Frys), so it's possible that south Danish Vikings were in Leeds?

A tøft is a piece of land over here, yes...

Supposition - perhaps exploring Jutland invaders came north from E.Anglia and got on so well with the Vikings that they became neighbours and set up the first ever allotments?

I'll get me coit! ;-)
You can take the lad out of Leeds - but you can't take the Leeds out of the lad. 
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farbank
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# Posted on: 02-Jul-2007 16:59:49.  


There were three 'Banks' known to loiners. The Bank from Steander up to approx Cavalier Hill on East St. Then it became [ where yours truly was born ], the Far Bank.[Notice now the nickname ]? But the Black Bank was across the bottom of York Rd. reaching into Burmantofts/Stony Rock. And was certainly because of the coal mine situated there. The quarry for the clay,[ behind the Regent picture house ], and the coal from the pit were all gobbled up by the Burmantofts pottery.
 
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wiggy
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# Posted on: 19-Aug-2007 21:33:16.  


Scandy Bramley wrote:
Burman/buurman in Germanic means neighbour...never heard the word here in Scandyland.
Although the south of Denmark and the north of Holland have very similar dialects (Friese/Frys), so it's possible that south Danish Vikings were in Leeds?

A tøft is a piece of land over here, yes...

Supposition - perhaps exploring Jutland invaders came north from E.Anglia and got on so well with the Vikings that they became neighbours and set up the first ever allotments?

I'll get me coit! ;-)

just checked my 'illustrated history of leeds' and it says the name is 'burgher-mens tofts'
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy? 
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wiggy
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# Posted on: 19-Aug-2007 21:47:45.  


why coldcotes,does anyone know? i know it was once called caldacottes,but why?
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy? 
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raveydavey
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# Posted on: 20-Aug-2007 20:44:08.  


Loinerpete wrote:
Also the area close to elland road on the lowfields was originally called islington, another london reference you could say.


Now you've mentioned it, I can remember seeing that in an old A-Z when I was a kid. That was 30 years since and the A-Z was quite old then (all the pages were yellowed with age).

Even then I was fascinated with maps.
Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act – George Orwell  
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wiggy
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# Posted on: 20-Aug-2007 20:56:19.  


raveydavey wrote:
Loinerpete wrote:
Also the area close to elland road on the lowfields was originally called islington, another london reference you could say.


Now you've mentioned it, I can remember seeing that in an old A-Z when I was a kid. That was 30 years since and the A-Z was quite old then (all the pages were yellowed with age).

Even then I was fascinated with maps.

i have always been facinated with maps,ever since i found a street atlas called 'leeds street by street',with an orange cover.i loved it because it had my old street in it that was ripped down in the early 70s
i do believe,induced by potent circumstances,that thou art' mine enemy? 
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stevief
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# Posted on: 20-Aug-2007 22:13:08.  


Martyn wrote:
There's an area of Leeds called 'Steander' it's between East Street and Marsh Lane where the timber merchants used to be and where the new apartments are being built. The name is a Norse word that means 'A stoney place'.
We can probably figure out how that area got named but there are a few that I can't figure out.

'Bank' just to the north of East Street where the railway line is. The nearest street is Railway Street.

'Islington' just next to Elland Road football ground.

'Potternewton' OK, newton is New Town, where's the potter?

'Little London'. What was it about this area that reminded people of London?

Any ideas?

If ever you're in Whitelocks yard,near the top bar,there's a manhole cover made at 'Steander Iron Foundry,East Street,Leeds'.Rikj says
there are others around the city centre.
 
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mayslass
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# Posted on: 04-Jan-2014 12:06:26.  


Hello I am new to the site but thought I might offer a small contribution.

Little London ( North Street End) of Leeds was indeed where the immigrants from London and other large Cities around the UK seemed to congregate. In fact up until the late 1960's North Street was full of small shops, with living quarters attached either above or behind. Many Jewish immigrants settled there and ran their businesses there. Small Bespoke tailors, making made to measure suits.
Jewish Bakeries, Clothing, shoe shops, Jewellers etc etc. It was wonderful, really buzzing you could buy almost anything on North Street, even get your eyes tested. As these properties were demolished the population of these dwellings and shops moved higher up the road to Roundhay Road and into Chapeltown, Chapel Allerton and Moortown. This side of town is still highly populated with immigrants today so the trend goes on..................Just saying that's all
 
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Phill_dvsn
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# Posted on: 04-Jan-2014 19:09:21.  


mayslass wrote:
In fact up until the late 1960's North Street was full of small shops, with living quarters attached either above or behind. Many Jewish immigrants settled there and ran their businesses there. Small Bespoke tailors, making made to measure suits.


Here's a good photo of North Street that might jog your memory maylass.



Full size photo here
http://tinyurl.com/q2pebmk

As mentioned above, the area just below North street was called Newton. That's another old district of Leeds that just seemed to disappear.
    
My flickr pictures are here
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Because lunacy was the influence for an album. It goes without saying that an album about lunacy will breed a lunatics obsessions with an album - The Dark side of the moon!
 
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